Topography of Great Britain: Or, British Traveller's Directory: Cornwall (Google eBook)

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C. Cooke - Roads
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Page 75 - Roslin ; for he kept a great court, and was royally served at his own table in vessels of gold and silver; Lord Dirleton being his master-household, Lord Borthwick his cup-bearer, and Lord Fleming his carver ; in whose absence they had deputies to attend, viz. Stewart laird of Drumlanrig, Tweddie laird of Drumerline, and Sandilands laird of Calder. He had his halls, and other apartments, richly adorned with embroidered hangings.
Page 133 - Lylliard lies under this stane, Little was her stature, but great was her fame ; Upon the English louns she laid mony thumps, And when her legs were cutted off, she fought upon her stumps.
Page 247 - Mayboll," says the inimitable Abercrummie,1 " stands upon an ascending ground from east to west, and lyes open to the south. It hath one principall street, with houses upon both sides, built of freestone; and it is beautifyed with the situation of two castles, one at each end of this street. That on the east belongs to the Erie of Cassilis.
Page 136 - His descriptions of extended scenes and general effects bring before us the whole magnificence of Nature, whether pleasing or dreadful. The gaiety of Spring, the splendour of Summer, the tranquillity of Autumn, and the horror of Winter take in their turns possession of the mind.
Page 65 - Ten times the subjects rose against the law, Twice did I see old Prelacy pull'd down, And twice the cloak was humbled by the gown.
Page 91 - Salisbury himself headed the party who were to enter : finding the gates open, he was advancing when John Copeland, one of his attendants, hastily passing before him, the portcullis was let down, and Copeland, mistaken for his lord, remained a prisoner.
Page 93 - The castle is built of a reddish stone, and several of the towers had a communication with the water. Under the front is a very large cavern of black and some red stone; this is said to have been the pit or dungeon for confining the prisoners, and a most dreadful one it must have been.
Page 177 - Nor was it an easy matter towards the south, it being, as by the sea on the other sides, there encircled by the river, woods, bogs, and trenches ; wherefore the army was obliged to attack it on the east, where there was a mount. The castle, after having been battered by all the warlike machines then in use, at length surrendered ; when the remainder of the garrison, being only sixty in number, were, on account of their gallant defence, taken into the king's favour, and were not only pardoned and...
Page 280 - The piers are 60 feet in height, from the bed of the river to the top of the parapet, and 24 feet in width.
Page 29 - At that time it is said to have consisted of no fewer than five courts, the most westerly of which was the largest ; it was bounded on the east by the front of the palace, which occupied the same space as it does at present; but the building extended itself farther towards the south.

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