In the Footsteps of the Ancients: The Origins of Humanism from Lovato to Bruni

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BRILL, 2003 - Philosophy - 562 pages
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This monograph demonstrates why humanism began in Italy in the mid-thirteenth century. It considers Petrarch a third generation humanist, who christianized a secular movement. The analysis traces the beginning of humanism in poetry and its gradual penetration of other Latin literary genres, and, through stylistic analyses of texts, the extent to which imitation of the ancients produced changes in cognition and visual perception. The volume traces the link between vernacular translations and the emergence of Florence as the leader of Latin humanism by 1400 and why, limited to an elite in the fourteenth century, humanism became a major educational movement in the first decades of the fifteenth. It revises our conception of the relationship of Italian humanism to French twelfth-century humanism and of the character of early Italian humanism itself. This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details.
  

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Of course, this excellent work on the origins of humanism should not have two stars on Google Books!

Contents

Chapter One Introduction
1
Chapter Two The Birth of the New Aesthetic
31
Chapter Three Padua and the Origins of Humanism
81
Chapter Four Albertino Mussato and the Second Generation
117
Chapter Five Florence and Vernacular Learning
174
Chapter Six Petrarch Father of Humanism?
230
Chapter Seven Coluccio Salutati
292
Chapter Eight The Revival of Oratory
338
Chapter Nine Leonardo Bruni
392
Chapter Ten The First Ciceronianism
443
Chapter Eleven Conclusion
495
Appendix
509
Bibliography
515
Indexes
549
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About the author (2003)

Ronald G. Witt, Ph.D. (1965) in History, Harvard University, is Professor of History at Duke University.

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