Indian Medicinal Plants: An Illustrated Dictionary (Google eBook)

Front Cover
C.P. Khare
Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 10, 2007 - Medical - 900 pages
3 Reviews

In 2004, Springer-Verlag Heidelberg published C.P.Khare’s "Encyclopedia of Indian Medicinal Plants" which contained 400 monographs comprising classical as well as contemporary research findings.

"Indian Medicinal Plants. An Illustrated Dictionary" is the second major one-volume reference work by C.P.Khare which has been dedicated to the distinguished scientist, Dr. A.P.J.Abdul Kalam, who did pioneering work by reviving the glory of medicinal and aromatic plants in Rashtrapati Bhavan.

Scientific monographs of "The Wealth of India" series (17 volumes) have been capsulised in the dictionary and corroborated with the judicious findings of German Commission E, European Cooperative on Phytotherapy (ESCOP) and WHO. Therapeutic leads, active indications and contraindications are salient features of the core text. These are based on herbal pharmacopoeias, compendiums and latest editions of standard reference works like "PDR for Herbal Medicines," "(Laurance) Review of Natural Products", "Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database". Leads for further research have been provided at a number of places.

The Dictionary is the first updated source of Ayurvedic, Unani and Siddha synonyms of their botanical counterparts, after a gap of more than 30 years. The synonyms which appeared in "The Wealth of India" series (1948-1976) and in Chopra’s "Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants" (1956) have been updated till January, 2007.

More than 2000 medicinal plants of "The Ayurvedic Formulary of India" and "The Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India" and more than 100 species of non-Indian origin, incorporated in "National Formulary of Unani Medicine" have been covered in the Dictionary. Divergent sources of Ayurvedic, Unani and Siddha herbs have been identified and a number of controversies have been sorted out.

Pharmacognosy experts have selected important herbs, which were specially collected from leading pharamaceutical companies and pharmacopoeial laboratories and included in the dictionary as four colour photographs under the "Crude Herb Identification Guide" section. This is a unique feature and makes it an exclusive treat.

The Dictionary has been presented in a user-friendly format, as a compact, handy, easy to use and moderately priced one-volume reference work. It unfolds hidden virtues and potentials of Indian herbs for busy professionals, researchers, practitioners of herbal as well as modern medicine, and library frequenters. It will prove a ready information source for students of botany, economic botany, pharmacy, agricultural and medical sciences, who aspire to have an edge over others and are keen to keep themselves abreast of the times.

  

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Contents

I
1
II
77
III
107
IV
199
V
229
VI
258
VII
277
VIII
301
XVI
459
XVII
531
XVIII
534
XIX
567
XX
641
XXI
683
XXII
690
XXIII
715

IX
322
X
341
XI
351
XII
357
XIII
390
XIV
433
XV
443
XXIV
722
XXV
727
XXVI
729
XXVII
740
XXVIII
773
XXIX
777
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Page 24 - Khumbi; Eng. Field mushroom). It is distributed in many parts of India, particularly on the hills and plains of northern and eastern India. It grows during the rainy season on dead organic matter, eg, rotting leaves and manure. It has a white, smooth, solid stalk with a thin ring attached at the middle or towards the top. The cap is rounded in the young stage; later becomes convex and finally more or less flat.

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