Murder at the Winter Games

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McClelland & Stewart, 2004 - Juvenile Fiction - 128 pages
1 Review
The Screech Owls have come to Salt Lake City for the Peewee Winter Games – with the championship game to be played on the same ice surface where the Canadian men and women won Olympic hockey gold!

Nish has plans to run his own competition: the Gross-Out Olympics, featuring everything from taping players to dressing room walls with duct tape to the “Snot Shot” – seeing how far they can fire a jellybean using only their noses. He also has a team contest to see who can figure out the Great Nish Secret and guess what the nuttiest Screech Owl of all has buried at centre ice for good luck.

But that secret pales once the Owls find out something strange – something terrifying – is going on in the tunnels deep beneath the magnificent hills surrounding the Olympic site.

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Review: Murder at the Winter Games (Screech Owls #18)

User Review  - Michelle DeKorver - Goodreads

Good pre-teen boy book, esp. for those who do not like fantasy! Read full review

Contents

Section 1
11
Section 2
18
Section 3
28
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

Roy MacGregor has been involved in hockey all his life. Growing up in Huntsville, Ontario, he competed for several years against a kid named Bobby Orr, who was playing nearby Parry Sound. He later returned to the game when he and his family settled in Ottawa, where he worked for the Ottawa Citizen and became the Southam National Sports Columnist. He still plays old-timers hockey and has been a minor-hockey coach for more than a decade.

Roy MacGregor is the author of several classics in the literature of hockey. Home Game (written with Ken Dryden and The Home Team were both No. 1 national bestsellers. He has also written the game’s best-known novel, The Last Season. His other books include Road Games, The Seven A.M. Practice, and, most recently, A Life in the Bush, a memoir of his father. He has also written books about native leaders and the Ottawa Valley.

Roy MacGregor is now a senior columnist for the National Post. He and his wife, Ellen, live in Kanata, Ontario. They have four children, Kerry, Christine, Jocelyn, and Gordon.

You can talk to Roy MacGregor at www.screechowls.com

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