Changing Order: Replication and Induction in Scientific Practice

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University of Chicago Press, Jun 15, 1992 - Social Science - 199 pages
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This fascinating study in the sociology of science explores the way scientists conduct, and draw conclusions from, their experiments. The book is organized around three case studies: replication of the TEA-laser, detecting gravitational rotation, and some experiments in the paranormal.

"In his superb book, Collins shows why the quest for certainty is disappointed. He shows that standards of replication are, of course, social, and that there is consequently no outside standard, no Archimedean point beyond society from which we can lever the intellects of our fellows."—Donald M. McCloskey, Journal of Economic Psychology

"Collins is one of the genuine innovators of the sociology of scientific knowledge. . . . Changing Order is a rich and entertaining book."—Isis

"The book gives a vivid sense of the contingent nature of research and is generally a good read."—Augustine Brannigan, Nature

"This provocative book is a review of [Collins's] work, and an attempt to explain how scientists fit experimental results into pictures of the world. . . . A promising start for new explorations of our image of science, too often presented as infallibly authoritative."—Jon Turney, New Scientist
  

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Contents

Chapter Two
29
Chapter Three
51
CI
53
Chapter Four
79
1
108
signal
110
o
111
Chapter Five
113
Chapter Six
129
the lack of direct relations between proponents and critics
155
Science as Expertise
159
Methodological Appendix
169
References Cited
175
Afterword
183
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

H. M. Collins is Professor of Sociology, Head of the School of Social Sciences, and Director of the Science Studies Centre at the University of Bath.

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