Natural history of New York ..., Part 6, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton & co. and Wiley & Putnam, 1859 - Natural history
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Page 509 - Corallum or bryozoum fixed, (free?) compound or simple, the parts bi-laterally arranged, consisting of simple stipes or of few or many simple or variously bifurcating branches, radiating more or less regularly from a centre, and in the compound forms united towards their base in a continuous thin corneous membrane or disk formed by an expansion of the substance of the branches, and which in the living state may have been in some degree gelatinous. Branches with a single or double series of cellules...
Page 73 - ... the production of the mountains themselves. At no point, nor along any line between the Appalachian and Rocky mountains, could the same forces have produced a mountain chain, because the materials of accumulation were insufficient; and though we may trace what appears to be the gradually subsiding influence of these forces, it is simply in these instances due to the paucity of the material upon which to exhibit its effects. The parallel lines of elevation, on the west of the Appalachians, are...
Page 95 - ... that the quantity carried " down by rivers from the surface of continents, is " comparatively trifling. While, therefore, the greatest " local accumulation of pressure is in the central area " of deep seas, the greatest local relief takes place along " the abraded coast lines. Here, then, in this view, " should occur the chief volcanic vents.
Page 203 - ... extension. Dorsal valve convex towards the middle, the mesial elevation very prominent, and the beak closely incurved against the area, or partially closing the foramen of the ventral valve. Area moderately wide, frequently much expanded, and becoming linear towards the extremities when the shell is much extended. Surface marked by four to six strong and abruptly elevated plications on each side of the mesial sinus and elevation, concentrically marked by strong imbricating lamellae, which are...
Page 507 - Cladograpsus, for the reason that one and the same species, as shown in single individuals, may be monoprionidean or diprionidean, or both; and we shall see still farther objections to this division, as we progress, in the utter impossibility of distinguishing these characteristics under certain circumstances. We do not yet perceive sufficient reason to separate the branching forms from those supposed to be not branched; for it is not always possible to decide which have or have not been ramose,...
Page 537 - ... possessed regarding the position of the shales containing the Trilobites, I have the testimony of Sir WE Logan, that the shales of this locality are in the upper part of the Hudson River group, or forming a part of a series of strata which he is inclined to rank as a distinct group, above the Hudson River proper. It would be quite superfluous for me to add one word in support of the opinion of the most able stratigraphical geologist of the American continent.
Page 518 - ... axis may vary from 30 to 60, but I prefer the mean of these two angles, viz., an angle of 45. I have already stated, and it will be seen by the figures 1 and 2, that the paddle boards do not all incline the same way, but that half of the number incline in one direction and the other half in the opposite direction. In large paddle wheels the oblique positions of the paddle boards may vary four times in the revolution of the paddle wheels instead of twice. As relates to my improvements in...
Page 508 - Admitting the first three of these to be organic remains, which the writer has elsewhere expressed his reasons for doubting, they are not related in structure, substance, or mode of occurrence, to the Graptolites, at least so far as regards American species; and the Nemapodia is not a fossil body, nor the imprint of one, but simply the recent track of a slug over the surface of the slates. The Genus RASTRITES of BARRANDE has not yet been recognized among American Graptolitidca. These forms are by...
Page 190 - Shell subsemicircular, about four-fifths as long as wide. Ventral valve concave; beak not projecting beyond the hinge. Dorsal valve concave near the umbo, very convex near the middle; beak not elevated above the cardinal margin; sides somewhat contracted below the extremities of the hinge. Hinge line straight, nearly or quite equalling the greatest width of the shell, finely crenulated. Area narrow, lineai , vertically striated.
Page 507 - European species, have been regarded as evidence that the animal in its living state was fixed ; while Mr. J. Barrande, admitting the force of these facts, asserts his belief that other species were free. It does not however appear probable that in a family of fossils so closely allied as are all the proper GraptolitideeE, any such great diversity in mode of growth would exist.

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