Experiment Eleven: Deceit and Betrayal in the Discovery of the Cure for Tuberculosis

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A&C Black, Apr 12, 2012 - History - 288 pages
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In 1943, Albert Schatz, a young Rutgers College Ph.D. student, worked on a wartime project in microbiology professor Selman Waksman's lab, searching for an antibiotic to fight infections on the front lines and at home. On his eleventh experiment on a common bacterium found in farmyard soil, Schatz discovered streptomycin, the first effective cure for tuberculosis, at that time the world's leading killer disease.

As director of Schatz's research, Waksman took credit for the discovery, belittled Schatz's work, and secretly enriched himself with royalties from the streptomycin patent filed by Merck, the pharmaceutical company. In an unprecedented lawsuit, young Schatz sued Waksman, was awarded the title of "co-discoverer" and a share of the royalties. But two years later, Professor Waksman alone was awarded the Nobel Prize. Schatz disappeared into academic obscurity.

For the first time, acclaimed author and journalist Peter Pringle reveals the scandals behind one of the most important discoveries in the history of medicine. The story unfolds on a tiny college campus in New Jersey, but its repercussions spread worldwide. The streptomycin patent was a breakthrough for the drug companies, overturning patent limits on products of nature and paving the way for today's biotech world. As dozens more antibiotics were found, many from the same family as streptomycin, the drug companies created oligopolies and reaped big profits. Pringle uses first-hand accounts and archives in the U.S. and Europe to unravel the intensely human story behind the discovery that started a revolution in the treatment of infectious diseases and shaped the future of Big Pharma
  

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Contents

PART I THE DISCOVERY
4
PART HI THE RIFT
71
14
117
PART VI THE PRIZE
123
The Road to Stockholm
175
The Drug Harvest
195
Wilderness Years
213
A Medal
228
Notes
241
71
251
117
257
Index
271
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Peter Pringle is a veteran British foreign correspondent and the author of several nonfiction books, including New York Times Notable, Food, Inc., and the best-selling Those Are Real Bullets, Aren't They? He has written for the New York Times and the Washington Post. He lives in New York City.

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