American Medical Botany: Being a Collection of the Native Medicinal Plants of the United States, Containing Their Botanical History and Chemical Analysis, and Properties and Uses in Medicine, Diet and the Arts, with Coloured Engravings ... (Google eBook)

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Cummings and Hilliard; [Cambridge] University Press, Hilliard and Metcalf, 1818 - Botany - 120 pages
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A very concise book. Easy to follow, and wonderful for field practice.

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Page 73 - Magnolia grandiflora; the land on which they stand is an exact level: the surface a shallow, loose, black mould, on a stratum of stiff, yellowish clay. These trees were about twelve feet high, spreading horizontally; their limbs meeting and interlocking with each other, formed one vast, shady, cool grove, so dense and humid as to exclude the sun-beams...
Page 43 - The roots dried and powdered are an excellent medicine in asthmatic cases, and often give relief when other means are ineffectual. It may be given with safety to children as well as to adults ; to the former, in doses of four, five or six grains, and to the latter, in doses of twenty grains and upwards. It is given in the fit, and repeated as the case may require.
Page 42 - ... to the calyx, and oblong four celled anthers. Style four sided, tapering; stigma minute, pubescent; germ roundish, concealed within the spadix. After the spathe decays, the spadix continues to grow, and with it every part of the flower except the anthers. When the fruit is ripe, the spadix has attained many times its original dimensions, while the calyx, filaments, and style are larger, very prominent, and separated from each other. Within the spadix, at the base of each style, is a round, fleshy...
Page 58 - The pollen forms ten distinct, yellowish, transparent bodies, of a flat and spatulate form, ending in curved filaments, which unite them by pairs to a minute dark tubercle at top. Each pair is suspended in the cells of two adjoining anthers, so that if a needle be inserted between the membranous edges of two anthers and forced out at top, it carries with it a pair of the pollen masses. Pistils two, completely concealed within the mass of anthers. Germs ovate, with erect styles. The fruit, as in other...
Page 23 - Pyrola was administered by himself and by other practioners with decided advantage. Dr. Satterly and Dr. Marcet are among those who have added their observations to the testimonies in its favour. Dr. Somerville found his patients to remark, that an agreeable sensation was perceived in the stomach soon after taking the Pyrola, and that this was followed in some instances by an extraordinary increase of appetite. He considers it as having in this respect a great advantage over other diuretics, none...
Page 22 - After having tried with little or temporary success, almost every variety of diuretic and cathartic medicines, and submitted twice to the operation of tapping, the patient had recourse to a strong infusion of the Pyrola, in the quantity of a pint every twenty four hours. Although the case was altogether an unpromising one, yet the plant gave relief, not only in the first, but in the subsequent instances of its use. It increased the urinal discharge, and at the same time produced an augmentation of...
Page 34 - The medical properties of the Podophyllum peltatum," says Dr. Bigelow, "are those of a sure and active cathartic, in which character it deserves a high rank among our indigenous productions. We have hardly any native plant which answers better the common purposes of jalap, aloes, and rhubarb.
Page 34 - Linnaeus makes them nine in his generic character, but in this climate I have found them more frequently seven even in luxuriant specimens growing in very rich soil. They are obovate, obtuse, concave, smooth, white with slight transparent veins. Stamens shorter than the petals, curving upwards ; the anthers oblong, twice as long as their filaments.

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