One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand

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Marsilio Pub., Sep 1, 1992 - Drama - 160 pages
14 Reviews

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Review: One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand

User Review  - Evelyn - Goodreads

That's a 3.5, really. Some patches of very beautiful prose, but--and it may be shallowness on my part--the existential crises did not seem so insurmountable. Most likely I have my shallow bourgeoisie ... Read full review

Review: One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand

User Review  - Larry - Goodreads

Not terrible, but dozens of authors since Poe have done the "Diary of a Madman" shtick and most of them made it a lot more interesting. There's some absurdity at the end involving the Church and maybe ... Read full review

Contents

Book One I My wife and my nose
3
And your nose?
6
Fine way of being alone
9
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (1992)

Born in Sicily, Pirandello attended the universities of Palermo, Rome, and Bonn. He obtained his doctorate in philology with a thesis on the dialect of his native town, Agrigento before settling in Rome to teach and write. In 1894, he married a Sicilian girl, Antonietta Portulano, who bore him three children before she went mad and afterwards provided the inspiration for many of his stories and plays. In all, Pirandello wrote 6 novels, some 250 short stories, and about 50 plays. It was a novel, Il fu Mattia Pascal (1904), that first brought him fame. Only in 1920, when he was past 50, did he turn seriously to playwriting. His first stage success had been a comedy, Liola (1917), written in the Agrigento dialect. It took its theme, if not its mood, from the Mandragola of Machiavelli (see Vols. 3 and 4). In 1921, Pirandello presented his most famous play Six Characters in Search of an Author. Here he seeks to confuse his spectators, who are forced into a paradox of reality and illusion when six "characters" search out the actors of a theatrical troupe to play out their inexorable story. The play exemplifies the Pirandellian conflict between art, which is unchanging and constant, and life, which is a continuous succession of mutations. Pirandello deliberately destroyed the traditional boundaries between audience and spectacle, reflecting the relativity and subjectivity of human existence. The play's unconventional format, which resulted in a riot, established Pirandello as Europe's leading avant-garde dramatist. The main body of Pirandello's plays falls into three overlapping categories, the first exploring the nature of the theater, the second the complexities of personality in the etymological or dramatic sense of the term, and the third rising to dramatic representation of the categorical imperatives of social, religious, and artistic community. Besides the world-famous Six Characters in Search of an Author (1918), his best plays in the three categories include Each in His Own Way (1924), It Is So (If You Think So) (1917), Henry IV (1922), The New Colony (1925), Lazarus, As You Desire Me (1930), and The Mountain Giants (1937), written after he had been awarded the Nobel Prize and left incomplete. Pirandello is the forerunner of much modern theater and literature; among the figures who owe their roots to the innovations of Pirandello are Bertolt Brecht, Jean Genet, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Samuel Beckett (see Vol. 1).

After leaving Princeton in his sophmore year to join the American Field Service, William Weaver drove an ambulance with the British army, first in Africa and then in Italy, initiating his long fascination with that country. After finally graduating from Princeton in 1946, he then returned to Italy, translating many of the most important modern Italians, from Pirandello to Morante, Gadda, Calvino, and Umberto Eco. His translations have received the National Book Award, the Galantiere Prize, the PEN translation prize twice, and the John Florio Prize 3 times. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and teaches at Bard College.

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