Glossary of Biotechnology Terms, Third Edition (Google eBook)

Front Cover
CRC Press, Mar 27, 2002 - Medical - 304 pages
5 Reviews
As a result of biotechnology becoming such a highly prolific area, non-technical people, such as lobbyists, attorneys, marketing, and public relations people, have had to quickly become conversant about a topic that is highly technical. In addition, various specialists working in the field of biotechnology, including chemists, geneticists, and biologists, occasionally have difficulty in understanding the terms utilized by each other in their respective specialties. It is, therefore, necessary to have a book to which you can refer so everyone can clearly discuss the topics in biotechnology.

This text provides concise definitions of terms for persons unfamiliar with biotechnology, and clarifies new terms and how they are being used for those who are already somewhat conversant in the area. The Glossary of Biotechnology Terms is a handy reference for people with little or no training in the biological and chemical sciences because it has been written in non-technical language and serves to bring you up to date on biotechnology terminology to provide for more effective communication. The definitions are written utilizing words that enable you to conceptualize the idea embodied in the term and explanations are based on analogy whenever possible. Written to assist those individuals who seek to gain an understanding of the terminology as it is currently used, the Glossary of Biotechnology Terms, Third Edition is compulsory for anyone involved in the biotechnology field or anyone who deals with professionals in biotechnology.
  

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very nice book contain all the information precisly n most impotant very versed manar i liked its glossary short n to the point
RNA genes (sometimes referred to as non-coding RNA or small RNA) are
genes that encode RNA that is not translated into a protein. The most prominent examples of RNA genes are transfer RNA (tRNA) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA), both of which are involved in the process of translation. However, since the late 1990s, many new RNA genes have been found, and thus RNA genes may play a much more significant role than previously thought. In the late 1990s and early 2000, there has been persistent evidence of more complex transcription occurring in mammalian cells (and possibly others). know more http://biotechnology-online.blogspot.com 

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