The Romance of Adultery: Queenship and Sexual Transgression in Old French Literature

Front Cover
University of Pennsylvania Press, Jan 1, 2011 - Literary Criticism - 192 pages
0 Reviews

Peggy McCracken offers a feminist historicist reading of Guenevere, Iseut, and other adulterous queens of Old French literature, and situates romance narratives about queens and their lovers within the broader cultural debate about the institution of queenship in twelfth- and thirteenth-century France.

Moving among a wide selection of narratives that recount the stories of queens and their lovers, McCracken explores the ways adultery is appropriated into the political structure of romance. McCracken examines the symbolic meanings and uses of the queen's body in both romance and the historical institutions of monarchy and points toward the ways medieval romance contributed to the evolving definition of royal sovereignty as exclusively male.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Royal Succession and the Queens Two Bodies
25
Royal Sovereignty and the Test of the Queens Body
52
Rumors Rivalries and the Queens Secret Adultery
84
Adultery Illegitimacy and Royal Maternity
119
Seduction Maternity and Royal Authority
144
Gendering Sovereignty in Medieval France
171
Notes
179
Bibliography
205
Index
219
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2011)

Peggy McCracken, the translator of Gui de Cambrai s Barlaam and Josaphat, is a professor of French at the University of Michigan.

Bibliographic information