Four Years' Service in India (Google eBook)

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W.H. Burton, 1853 - India - 209 pages
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Page 173 - They also showed great skill in their movements; for they made a gallant attempt to turn our right flank. To oppose this, our right was thrown back, and the right brigade of cavalry was ordered to charge, which they did in a splendid style, cutting the enemy down in all directions, and driving them back in disorder. By this time, the fight had become general along the whole line: roll after roll of musketry rent the air, and clouds of smoke rose high and thick, while death was dealt out without mercy;...
Page 172 - His battery was exposed to a heavy cross fire, and he and nearly all of them were killed. He was wounded first by a round shot, and was requested to go to the rear ; but he said he would have another shot or two first, when he was struck by another and killed, and his brave men never flinched from their guns, although exposed to such a destructive fire. The artillery had been in play about two hours, when the enemy's guns began to slacken. We had most of this time been lying down upon the ground,...
Page 127 - ... country, laid down to die, near the houses where they were born. The streets, the public squares, and especially the churches, were crowded with these unhappy persons, who mourned as they lay on the remains of their property, but shewed no signs of despair. The victors and the vanquished were become equally brutish; the former by excess of fortune, the latter by excess of misery.
Page 188 - ... they displayed, and for the sustained and cheerful exertions they have made. In anticipation of the wishes of the Honourable Court of Directors, the Governor-General will grant to every officer and soldier who has been employed within the Punjaub in this campaign, to the date of the occupation of Peshawur, a medal, bearing the word " Punjaub," in commemoration of the honourable service they have done.
Page 188 - India. Once again the Governor-General offers to his Excellency the Commander-in-Chief, to the General Officers, the Officers, Non-commissioned Officers, and Soldiers of the Army, the assurance of his deep and unfeigned gratitude for the great services they have rendered to the country, for the zeal and gallantry they have displayed, and for the sustained and cheerful exertions they have made.
Page 173 - We'll finish them today'. The enemy formed several squares, to keep us in check, whilst they got their guns away; but our field artillery galloped to the front, and opened a most destructive fire of grape and canister, which swept them down by whole battalions. On we rushed, bearing all down before us, charging and cheering. We took every gun we came up to, but their artillery fought desperately : they stood and defended their guns to the last. They threw their arms round them, kissed them, and died....
Page 12 - We buried our dead at night, and such a grave-yard I never witnessed. The earth being so full of water, it filled the graves immediately ; so that we had to pile the earth and stones upon the coffin to sink it.
Page 43 - I was very nearly done up myself. Here my tongue was swollen, and mouth parched up; and I felt very weak. My brain seemed to be on fire, and my eyes as if they would jump out of my head. I felt as if I were done; but I made a rush at the water and got some. God knows what a relief I felt, as if I had lost a great load! When most of the throng was over, I filled a tin flask which I carried with me for that purpose; so did all others who had them. Our officers were as bad as the men. What thousands...
Page 188 - Commander-in-chief, to the general officers, the officers, non-commissioned officers, and soldiers of the army, the assurance of his deep and unfeigned gratitude for the great services they have rendered to the country by the zeal and gallantry they displayed, and for the sustained and cheerful exertions they have made.
Page 127 - ... they clasped in their arms. They were followed by the rest of their children, who, fearful of being lost, ran crying after their mothers. Old men, overwhelmed more by grief than by the weight of years, were seldom able to follow their families; many of them, weeping for the ruin of the country, laid down to die, near the houses where they were born. The streets, the public squares, and especially the churches, were crowded with these unhappy persons, who mourned as they lay on the remains of...

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