Memoirs of the Life of David Garrick, Esq: Interspersed with Characters and Anecdotes of His Theatrical Contemporaries. The Whole Forming a History of the Stage, which Includes a Period of Thirty-six Years, Volumes 1-2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
The author, 1781
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 287 - Here Cumberland lies, having acted his parts, The Terence of England, the mender of hearts ; A flattering painter, who made it his care, To draw men as they ought to be, not as they are.
Page 402 - James, whose skill in physic will be long remembered ; and with David Garrick, whom I hoped to have gratified with this character of our common friend. But what are the hopes of man ? I am disappointed by that stroke of death which has eclipsed the gaiety of nations, and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure.
Page 162 - As an actor, confess'd without rival to shine; As a wit, if not first, in the very first line; Yet, with talents like these, and an excellent heart, The man had his failings a dupe to his art.
Page 287 - Like a tragedy queen he has dizen'd her out, Or rather like tragedy giving a rout. His fools have their follies so lost in a crowd Of virtues and feelings that folly grows proud; And coxcombs, alike in their failings alone, Adopting his portraits, are pleased with their own.
Page 288 - Adopting his portraits, are pleased with their own. Say, where has our poet this malady caught? Or wherefore his characters thus without fault? Say, was it that, vainly directing his view To find out men's virtues, and finding them few, Quite sick of pursuing each troublesome elf, He grew lazy at last, and drew from himself?
Page 408 - Within the magic circle of the eye ; If feelings which few hearts, like his, can know, And which no face so well as his can show, Deserve the preference ; Garrick ! take the chair, Nor quit it till thou place an Equal there.
Page 408 - Shall mark his memory with a sad delight ! Still in your heart's dear record bear his name ; Cherish the keen regret that lifts his fame ; To you it is bequeath'd, assert the trust, And to his worth 'tis all you can be just.
Page 162 - Though secure of our hearts, yet confoundedly sick If they were not his own by finessing and trick: He cast off his friends as a huntsman his pack, For he knew when he pleased he could whistle them back.
Page 333 - Whatever may be the changes of my future life, the deepest impression of your kindness will always remain here " (putting his hand on his breast), " fixed and unalterable. I will very readily agree to my successors having more skill and ability for their...
Page 152 - ... and in this he was certainly justifiable. Mr. Garrick could reasonably expect no thanks for the acting a new play, which he would have rejected, if he had not been convinced it would have amply rewarded his pains and expense. I believe the manager was willing to accept the play, but he wished to be courted to it, and the Doctor was not disposed to purchase his friendship by the resignation of his sincerity.

Bibliographic information