DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA (Google eBook)

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Contents

I
1
II
8
III
14
IV
20
V
22
VI
33
VIII
35
IX
37
XLV
184
XLVII
187
XLVIII
193
XLIX
198
L
205
LI
208
LII
213
LIV
215

X
40
XII
47
XIII
56
XIV
63
XV
65
XVI
73
XVII
74
XVIII
77
XIX
86
XX
94
XXI
96
XXII
103
XXIII
108
XXV
114
XXVI
119
XXVII
122
XXVIII
124
XXIX
129
XXXI
135
XXXII
140
XXXIV
147
XXXV
152
XXXVI
155
XXXVII
158
XXXVIII
161
XXXIX
163
XLI
168
XLII
172
XLIII
178
XLIV
180
LV
226
LVI
230
LVII
233
LVIII
241
LX
245
LXI
249
LXIII
258
LXV
263
LXVI
266
LXVII
271
LXVIII
275
LXIX
278
LXXI
281
LXXII
297
LXXIV
305
LXXV
308
LXXVI
324
LXXVII
333
LXXVIII
338
LXXIX
344
LXXX
346
LXXXI
354
LXXXII
356
LXXXIII
360
LXXXIV
365
LXXXV
373
LXXXVI
389
LXXXVII
397
LXXXVIII
408

Common terms and phrases

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Page 129 - Americans of all ages, all conditions, and all dispositions, constantly form associations. They have not only commercial and manufacturing companies, in which all take part, but associations of a thousand other kinds religious, moral, serious, futile, extensive or restricted, enormous or diminutive.
Page 262 - I have nowhere seen woman occupying a loftier position ; and if I were asked, now that I am drawing to the close of this work, in which I have spoken of so many important things done by the Americans, to what the singular prosperity and growing strength of that people ought mainly to be attributed, I should reply, to the superiority of their women.
Page 132 - Feelings and opinions are recruited, the heart is enlarged, and the human mind is developed only by the reciprocal influence of men upon one another. I have shown that these influences are almost null in democratic countries; they must therefore be artificially created, and this can only be accomplished by associations.
Page 420 - I subjoin a short catalogue and analysis of the works which seem to me the most important to consult.* At the head of the general documents which it would be advantageous to examine, I place the work entitled An Historical Collection of State Papers, and other authentic Documents, intended as Materials for a History of the United States of America...
Page 1 - I THINK that in no country in the civilized world is less attention paid to philosophy than in the United States. The Americans have no philosophical school of their own ; and they care but little for all the schools into which Europe is divided, the very names of which are scarcely known to them.
Page 123 - The great advantage of the Americans is, that they have arrived at a state of democracy without having to endure a democratic revolution; and that they are born equal, instead of becoming so.
Page 145 - There they meet together in large numbers, they converse, they listen to each other, and they are mutually stimulated to all sorts of undertakings. They afterwards transfer to civil life the notions they have thus acquired, and make them subservient to a thousand purposes. Thus it is by the enjoyment of a dangerous freedom that the Americans learn the art of rendering the dangers of freedom less formidable.
Page 431 - The power and jurisdiction of parliament, says Sir Edward Coke, is so transcendent and absolute that it cannot be confined. either for causes or persons, within any bounds.
Page 121 - Thus, not only does democracy make every man forget his ancestors, but it hides his descendants and separates his contemporaries from him ; it throws him back forever upon himself alone, and threatens in the end to confine him entirely within the solitude of his own heart.
Page 1 - To evade the bondage of system and habit, of family-maxims, class-opinions, and, in some degree, of national prejudices; to accept tradition only as a means of information, and existing facts only as a lesson used in doing otherwise and doing better...

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