Typographia, Or The Printers' Instructor: Including an Account of the Origin of Printing, with Biographical Notices of the Printers of England, from Caxton to the Close of the Sixteenth Century: a Series of Ancient and Modern Alphabets, and Domesday Characters: Together with an Elucidation of Every Subject Connected with the Art. 2 Vol. Il. Por. Nar. D. (Google eBook)

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Longman. ... & Green, 1824
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Page 282 - Enprynted at London in the fletestrete at the sygne of the sonne, by Wynkyn de Worde prynter vnto the moost excellent pryncesse my lady the kynges graundame. In the yere of our lorde god M.CCCCC and ix the xij daye of the moneth of Juyn.
Page 603 - England, with the introduction of printing, the illiterate and terrified monks declaimed from their pulpits, that there was now a new language discovered, called Greek, of which people should beware, since it was that which produced all the heresies; that in this language was come forth a book called the New Testament, which was now in every body's hands, and was full of thorns and briars ; that there was also another language now started up, which they called Hebrew, and that they who learned it...
Page 241 - Brandon commanded the bird to tell him the cause why they sat so thick on the tree and sang so merrily. And then the bird said: " Sometime we were angels in heaven. But when our master Lucifer fell down into hell for his high pride...
Page 4 - ... gunpowder, it had not yet been brought to light. Of its effects on literature, they assert, that it has increased the number of books, till they distract, rather than improve the mind ; and of its malignant influence on morals, they complain, that it has often introduced a false refinement, incompatible with the simplicity of primitive piety and genuine virtue. With respect to its literary ill...
Page 129 - ... he used two-line letters of a Gothic kind. As he printed long before the present method was adopted of adding an Errata at the end of a book, to supply this deficiency, his extraordinary exactness induced him to have recourse to a most laborious task, namely, that of revising every page (after the book was printed,) and marking the corrections with red ink : one copy being thus perfected, he then employed a careful person to go through the whole impression, and correct the faults.
Page 603 - Greek, of which people should beware, since it was that which produced all the heresies: lhat in this language was come forth a book called the New Testament, which was now in everybody's hands, and was full of thorns and briers: that there was also another language now started up, which they called Hebrew, and that they who learned it were termed Hebrews. One of the priests declared, with a most prophetic wisdom, " We must root out printing, or printing will root out us...
Page 531 - Upon this the archbishop interceded with the lord treasurer for the queen's letters, that Day might go forward with his building, whereby, he said, his honour would deserve well of Christ's church, and of the prince and state. The archbishop also urged that the privy council had lately written to him and the other ecclesiastical commissioners, to help Day, perhaps in vending his books, and encouraging the clergy to buy them.
Page 102 - ... any artificer or merchant stranger, of what nation or country he be, or shall be of, for bringing into this realm, or selling by retail or otherwise, any books written or printed, or for inhabiting within this said realm for the same intent...
Page 7 - ... church. This man deserves to be restored to the honour of being the first inventor of printing, of which he has been unjustly deprived by others, who have enjoyed the praises due to him alone. As he was walking in the wood contiguous to the city, which was the general custom of the richer citizens and men of leisure, in the afternoon and on holidays, he began to cut...
Page 241 - Sunday is a day of rest from all worldly occupation, and therefore that day all we be made as white as any snow for to praise our Lord in the best wise we may.

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