Tissue Engineering: From Lab to Clinic (Google eBook)

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Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 16, 2010 - Technology & Engineering - 643 pages
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Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field incorporating the principles of biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine to create biological substitutes of native tissues for scientific research or clinical use. Specific applications of this technology include studies of tissue development and function, investigating drug response, and tissue repair and replacement. This area is rapidly becoming one of the most promising treatment options for patients suffering from tissue failure. This abundantly illustrated and well-structured guide serves as a reference for all clinicians and researchers dealing with tissue engineering issues in their daily practice.
  

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Contents

Tissue Engineering of Organs
198
Tissue Types
347

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Norbert Pallua is Professor, Chairman and Director of the Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery, Burn Center at the RWTH University Hospital, Aachen, Germany. Professor Pallua is recognized to be among the leading Plastic Surgeons in Germany. He is also nominated Honorary Professor and Director of several Universities. Professor Pallua is the author of numerous scientific and clinical publications and is a reviewer for several leading journals. He has been responsible for developing innovative methods of extensive facial reconstruction and has led research into tissue engineering, with a particular focus on soft tissue. Professor Christoph Suschek works in the laboratory of the Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery, Burn Center at the RWTH University Hospital in Aachen as leading biologist. Professor Suschek is the author or co-author of many journal articles presenting research related to tissue engineering approaches, such as ways in which the induction of inflammation might be used to stimulate adipose tissue formation.

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