pt. I. Offcial letters relating to the French war, and private letters before the American revolution: March, 1754-May, 1775 (Google eBook)

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Harper & brothers, 1847 - United States
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Page 405 - ... we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight ; I repeat it. sir, we must fight ! An appeal to arms, and to the God of Hosts, is all that is left us ! They tell us, sir, that we are weak, unable to cope with so formidable an adversary.
Page 90 - As a remarkable instance of this, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colonel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some important service to his country.
Page 144 - The supplicating tears of the women and moving petitions of the men melt me into such deadly sorrow, that I solemnly declare, if I know my own mind, I could offer myself a willing sacrifice to the butchering enemy, provided that would contribute to the people's ease.
Page 446 - The cold was so extremely severe, that mr. Gist had all his fingers, and some of his toes frozen, and the water was shut up so hard, that we found no difficulty in getting off the island, on the ice, in the morning, and went to mr. Frazier's.
Page 396 - Peyton Randolph, Richard Henry Lee, George Washington, Patrick Henry, Richard Bland...
Page 432 - As I got down before the canoe, I spent some time in viewing the rivers and the land in the fork, which I think extremely well situated for a Fort, as it has the absolute command of both rivers.
Page 531 - Ohio, view the settlements of the people upon this river with an uneasy and jealous eye, and do not scruple to say, that they must be compensated for their right if the people settle thereo'n, notwithstanding the cession of the Six Nations.
Page 402 - I may be allowed to answer in the negative; and give me leave to add, as my opinion, that more blood will be spilled on this occasion, if the ministry are determined to push matters to extremity, than history has ever yet furnished instances of in the annals of North America...
Page 36 - Your Honor may depend I will not be surprised, let them come at what hour they will ; and this is as much as I can promise. But my best endeavours shall not be wanting to effect more. I doubt not, if you hear I am beaten, but you will hear at the same time, that we have done our duty, in fighting as long as there was a shadow of hope.
Page 88 - I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, although death was levelling my companions on every side...

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