Nature, Volume 17 (Google eBook)

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Nature Publishing Group, 1878 - Science
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Page 298 - Tis not too late to seek a newer world. Push off, and, sitting well in order, smite The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths Of all the western stars, until I die. It may be that the gulfs will wash us down: It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles, And see the great Achilles, whom we knew. Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho...
Page 258 - Thro' either babbling world of high and low; Whose life was work, whose language rife With rugged maxims hewn from life; Who never spoke against a foe; Whose eighty winters freeze with one rebuke All great self-seekers trampling on the right...
Page 288 - They have likewise discovered two lesser stars, or satellites, which revolve about Mars, whereof the innermost is distant from the centre of the primary planet exactly three of his diameters, and the outermost five...
Page 199 - No book with the same objects in view has ever been published In which the clearness of the rules laid down and the illustrative diagrams have been so satisfactory.
Page 279 - It is impossible by means of inanimate material agency to derive mechanical effect from any portion of matter by cooling it below the temperature of the coldest of the surrounding objects.
Page 53 - JW Powell, in charge of the United States Geographical and Geological Survey of the Rocky Mountain Region...
Page 25 - TRANSCAUCASIA AND ARARAT: being Notes of a Vacation Tour in the Autumn of 1876. With an Illustration and Map. Third Edition. Crown 8vo.
Page 258 - If the total actual heat of a homogeneous and uniformly hot substance be conceived to be divided into any number of equal parts, the effects of those parts in causing work to be performed are equal.
Page 309 - Without offering any hypothesis regarding the cause of this symmetrical grouping of atoms, it is sufficiently evident, from the examples just given, that such a tendency or law prevails, and that, no matter what the character of the uniting atoms may be, the combining power of the attracting element, if I may be allowed the term, is always satisfied by the same number of these atoms.
Page 105 - Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge," entitled " On the Orbit and Phenomena of a Meteoric Fire-ball, seen July 20, 1860." The various accounts of the meteor are printed in the memoir, and reveal some peculiar points of interest in its path. There were two " remarkable ruptures of the main body of the meteor...

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