A history of gardening in England (Google eBook)

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B. Quaritch, 1896 - Gardening - 405 pages
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Page 19 - Whitsun ales, and morris dances, and the setting up of maypoles and other sports therewith used, so as the same be had in due and convenient time, without impediment or neglect of divine service: and that women shall have leave to carry rushes to the church for the decoring of it, according to their old custom.
Page 129 - For fountains, they are a great beauty and refreshment ; but pools mar all, and make the garden unwholesome, and full of flies and frogs. Fountains I intend to be of two natures ; the one that sprinkleth or spouteth water: the other a fair receipt of water, of some thirty or forty foot square, but without fish, or slime, or mud.
Page 114 - I speak not, because they are field flowers ; but those which perfume the air most delightfully, not passed by as the rest, but being trodden upon and crushed, are three, that is, burnet, wild thyme, and watermints ; therefore you are to set whole alleys of them, to have the pleasure when you walk or tread.
Page 247 - How contrary to this simplicity is the modern practice of gardening. We seem to make it our study to recede from Nature, not only in the various tonsure of greens into the most regular and formal shapes, but even in monstrous attempts beyond the reach of the art itself: we run into sculpture, and are yet better pleased to have our trees in the most awkward figures of men and animals, than in the most regular of their own.
Page 150 - Her lips were red, and one was thin, Compared to that was next her chin. Some bee had stung it newly; But Dick, her eyes so guard her face, I durst no more upon them gaze Than on the sun in July.
Page 246 - The Tower of Babel, not yet finished. St. George in box : his arm scarce long enough, but will be in a condition to stick the dragon by next April.
Page 124 - For the ordering of the ground within the great hedge, I leave it to variety of device ; advising, nevertheless...
Page 246 - Our British gardeners, on the contrary, instead of humouring nature, love to deviate from it as much as possible. Our trees rise in cones, globes, and pyramids. We see the marks of the scissors upon every plant and bush.
Page 176 - As by their choice collections may appear, Of what is rare in land, in seas, in air ; Whilst they (as Homer's Iliad in a nut) A world of wonders in one closet shut. These famous antiquarians that had been Both gardeners to the Rose and Lily queen Transplanted now themselves, sleep here.
Page 283 - With mazy error under pendent shades Ran nectar, visiting each plant, and fed Flowers worthy of Paradise; which not nice art In beds and curious knots, but nature boon Poured forth profuse on hill and dale and plain...

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