Lattice: Multivariate Data Visualization with R (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Springer, Feb 15, 2008 - Computers - 286 pages
2 Reviews
R is rapidly growing in popularity as the environment of choice for data analysis and graphics both in academia and industry. Lattice brings the proven design of Trellis graphics (originally developed for S by William S. Cleveland and colleagues at Bell Labs) to R, considerably expanding its capabilities in the process. Lattice is a powerful and elegant high level data visualization system that is sufficient for most everyday graphics needs, yet flexible enough to be easily extended to handle demands of cutting edge research. Written by the author of the lattice system, this book describes it in considerable depth, beginning with the essentials and systematically delving into specific low levels details as necessary. No prior experience with lattice is required to read the book, although basic familiarity with R is assumed. The book contains close to 150 figures produced with lattice. Many of the examples emphasize principles of good graphical design; almost all use real data sets that are publicly available in various R packages. All code and figures in the book are also available online, along with supplementary material covering more advanced topics.
  

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Review: Lattice: Multivariate Data Visualization with R (Use R!)

User Review  - Jeffrey - Goodreads

Pretty dry for a straight read-through, but very useful as a reference book. One of the few times I have found dead tree to be a better than the online/inline documentation for a programming tool. Read full review

Review: Lattice: Multivariate Data Visualization with R (Use R!)

User Review  - Kenny Daily - Goodreads

Great reference for doing complex plotting, especially when you have categorical data and you need automatic separation for plotting. A steep learning curve made easier by great examples throughout ... Read full review

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Contents

Introduction
1
11 Multipanel conditioning
2
112 The Trellis call
3
113 Kernel density plots
4
12 Superposition
5
13 The trellis object
6
131 The missing Trellis display
7
Basics
10
721 Nonstandard settings
129
73 Nongraphical options
131
Plot Coordinates and Axis Annotation
133
82 The scales argument
134
Ticks and labels
135
823 Defaults
138
cloud and wireframe
139
83 Limits and aspect ratio
140

A Technical Overview of lattice
13
212 The data argument
14
214 Shingles
15
22 Dimension and physical layout
16
221 Aspect ratio
19
222 Layout
20
between and skip
24
Captions labels and legends
26
25 Graphing the data
28
252 The panel function
30
253 The panel function demystified
31
26 Return value
33
Visualizing Univariate Distributions
34
32 Large datasets
37
33 Histograms
39
34 Normal QQ plots
40
341 Normality and the BoxCox transformation
42
342 Other theoretical QQ plots
43
35 The empirical CDF
44
37 Boxandwhisker plots
47
38 Strip plots
50
39 Coercion rules
52
310 Discrete distributions
53
311 A note on the formula interface
54
Displaying Multiway Tables
55
42 Bar chart
57
421 Manipulating order
61
422 Bar charts and discrete distributions
63
43 Visualizing categorical data
65
Scatter Plots and Extensions
67
52 Advanced indexing using subscripts
71
53 Variants using the type argument
75
531 Superposition and type
79
54 Scatterplot variants for large data
82
55 Scatterplot matrix
84
551 Interacting with scatterplot matrices
86
56 Parallel coordinates plot
87
Trivariate Displays
91
611 Dynamic manipulation versus stereo viewing
95
612 Variants and panel functions
96
62 Surfaces and twoway tables
98
621 Data preparation
99
622 Visualizing surfaces
102
623 Visualizing discrete array data
105
63 Theoretical surfaces
110
631 Parameterized surfaces
111
64 Choosing a palette for falsecolor plots
113
Finer Control
116
Graphical Parameters and Other Settings
117
711 Themes
120
713 Initializing a graphics device
121
714 Reading and modifying a theme
122
715 Usage and alternative forms
125
72 Available graphical parameters
126
832 Explicit specification of limits
141
833 Choosing aspect ratio by banking
143
84 Scale components and the axis function
144
842 Axis
148
Labels and Legends
151
92 Legends
152
922 The colorkey argument
155
923 The key argument
156
924 The problem with settings and the autokey argument
158
925 Dropping unused levels from groups
159
The legend argument
161
93 Page annotation
162
Data Manipulation and Related Topics
165
102 The extended formula interface
166
103 Combining data sources with makegroups
170
104 Subsetting
173
1041 Dropping of factor levels
176
105 Shingles and related utilities
177
1051 Coercion to factors and shingles
182
1052 Using shingles for axis breaks
183
1053 Cutandstack plots
184
106 Ordering levels of categorical variables
187
107 Controlling the appearance of strips
193
108 An Example Revisited
198
Manipulating the trellis Object
201
112 The plot printand summary methods
202
113 The update method and trellislastobject
206
114 Tukey meandifference plot
208
115 Specialized manipulations
210
116 Manipulating the display
211
Interacting with Trellis Displays
214
1211 Interaction
216
123 Interactive additions
217
124 Other uses
223
Extending Trellis Displays
227
Advanced Panel Functions
229
1312 Accessor functions
231
1313 Arguments
232
133 Some more examples
235
1332 A modified boxandwhisker plot
237
1333 Corrgrams as customized level plots
238
134 Threedimensional projections
241
135 Maps
242
1351 A simple projection scheme
244
1352 Maps with conditioning
245
New Trellis Displays
247
141 S3 methods
248
142 S4 methods
249
143 New functions
251
Multipanel pie charts
252
References
255
Index
259
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