The Academy: A Journal of Secondary Education, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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George A. Bacon, 1888 - Education
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Page 141 - THE RISE AND EARLY CONSTITUTION OF UNIVERSITIES. WITH A SURVEY OF MEDIEVAL EDUCATION.
Page 166 - For say a foolish thing but oft enough (And here 's the secret of a hundred creeds, Men get opinions as boys learn to spell, By reiteration chiefly), the same thing Shall pass at last for absolutely wise, And not with fools exclusively.
Page 205 - Let me not be censured for this digression as pedantic or paradoxical; for, if I have Milton against me, I have Socrates on my side. It was his labour to turn philosophy from the study of nature to speculations upon life; but the innovators whom I oppose are turning off attention from life to nature.
Page 357 - Many-sidedness of culture makes our vision clearer and keener in particulars. For after all, the noblest definition of Science is that breadth and impartiality of view which liberates the mind from specialties, and enables it to organize whatever we learn, so that it become real Knowledge by being brought into true and helpful relation with the rest.
Page 205 - It was his labour to turn philosophy from the study of nature to speculations upon life; but the innovators whom I oppose are turning off attention from life to nature. They seem to think that we are placed here to watch the growth of plants or the motions of the stars; Socrates was rather of opinion, that what we had to learn was how to do good and avoid evil.
Page 205 - Whether we provide for action or conversation, whether we wish to be useful or pleasing, the first requisite is the religious and moral knowledge of right and wrong ; the next is an acquaintance with the history of mankind, and with those examples which may be said to embody truth, and prove by events the reasonableness of opinions.
Page 205 - Those authors, therefore, are to be read at schools* that supply most axioms of prudence, most principles of moral truth, and most materials for conversation ; and these purposes are best served by poets, orators, and historians. Let me not be censured for this digression as pedantic or paradoxical ; for, if I have Milton against me, I have Socrates on my side. It was his labour to turn philosophy from the study of nature to speculations upon life ; but the innovators...
Page 404 - PROJECT. The projector of this brilliant scheme was the Chevalier Quesnay de Beaurepaire, grandson of the famous French philosopher and economist Dr. Quesnay, who was the court physician of Louis XV. Chevalier Quesnay, the grandson, was one of those enthusiastic Frenchmen who, like La Fayette, came over to this country to aid in the war of the Revolution. Led on, he says in his memoir,1 by the hope of achieving military distinction, Quesnay served as a captain in Virginia during the years 1777-78.
Page 205 - Physiological learning is of such rare emergence, that one may know another half his life, without being able to estimate his skill in hydrostaticks or astronomy ; but his moral and prudential character immediately appears. Those authors, therefore, are to be read at schools that supply most axioms of prudence, most principles of moral truth, and most materials for conversation ; and these purposes are best served...
Page 406 - MY DEAR AND HONORED FATHER : With this letter you will receive a project for a French academy which is to be established here. It is a very extensive plan, which will do honor to the gentleman who has designed it, as well as to America. If it can be executed, it will in no way interfere with the plans of the colleges; it will be solely for the completion of the education of young men after they have graduated from college. Those who are already under M. Quesnay have made great progress. " He regards...

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