Life-histories of African game animals, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1914 - Mammals - 798 pages
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Page 166 - ... association is permanent, so that these cases evidently afford instances of polygamy. Two or three lionesses sometimes live in companionship, with perhaps the cubs of one or more of them, and a single lioness may be found either by herself or with the cubs of one litter, or of two litters. On one occasion...
Page 156 - ... movement. It is a movement in the interest of the average citizen, and especially in the interest of the man of small means. Wealthy men can keep private game preserves and private parks in which they can see all kinds of strange and beautiful creatures; but the ordinary men and women, and especially those of small means, can enjoy the loveliness and the wonder of nature, and can revel in the sight of beautiful birds, only on terms that will permit their fellow-citizens the like enjoyment. In...
Page 164 - The lion is common throughout all the portions of East Africa which we visited except on the high, wet plateaux and in the dense forests; we did not come across it in Uganda; but it was found on the Lado and less commonly along the White Nile to the Sobat. There are geographical varieties; but the presence or absence of the mane, and its color black, tawny, or mixed represent individual and not specific or subspeciflc variation; black and yellow-maned lions come from the same litter, and...
Page vii - The present treatise is a faithful account of what we have ourselves observed; it sets forth much of what is now known; but its real value must lie in its being treated primarily as a suggestion of what is still open for discovery in this vast field of animal psychology and adjustment to environment.
Page 167 - ... may be found either by herself or with the cubs of one litter, or of two litters. On one occasion we found a lioness associating with a young male, not yet quite fully grown but already much bigger than she was, and a couple of young cubs perhaps two or three months old ; now, from information given us by the natives, we are inclined to think (although, of course, we are not certain) that the young male was one of her cubs of a former litter, and the father of the cubs that were with them. Finally,...
Page 169 - ... leisurely strolling in the open, and they often return to their resting-places after sunrise, and leave them before sunset although even under such circumstances it is only exceptionally that they hunt except under cover of darkness. Once we came on a big male lion in midafternoon walking back across the open plain to a zebra he had killed on the previous night; and once, at the same time of day, we came on a lioness leading her cubs back to the carcass of a wildebeest, also slain over night....
Page 416 - ... B) is normal, but the terminal abdominal segments are greatly narrowed and produce a saber-like appearance. SEXUAL DIMORPHISM Besides the differences between the two sexes in the shape of the antennal segments, already discussed, there are many other structural differences. In some species the eyes of the female are much smaller than those of the male, and in the latter the eyes may be contiguous (holoptic) or approximated. In species with elongated rostra, such as in the genus Geranomyia, the...
Page 266 - Hunting dogs usually go in big packs. They master all the smaller and the young of all the larger antelopes, and there is reason to believe that at times, although rarely, they kill even the biggest antelope and half-grown buffalo also. Yet we saw zebras feeding near them without heeding them, and also rushing at them and driving them off when they came too close. They are extremely destructive to game, and at times to goats and sheep; and they will menace man, although we have no authentic instance...
Page 286 - ... skull, but the extremes in width and length do not equal the specimen from the Lado Enclave described as the type of bufo. A specimen of the same age as the type from the Loita Plains has a skull length of 350, width of the parietal constriction 60, and length of post-orbital portion 52. Remarks. The type specimen was collected on the shores of a small pond near Chief Sururu's village in the vicinity of Rhino Camp. It had been killed by a lion the night previous to the arrival of Colonel...
Page 237 - ... large-spotted and a smallspotted form, the former of which he attempted to describe as suahelica. No substantial difference in the size of the spots in adults from the region can be detected. There is, however, a marked difference in spotting in the immature and the adults, the former being fine spotted, owing to the rosettes being broken up into several solid spots, which later coalesce to form the rosettes of the adult. Neumann's skins were chiefly flat specimens obtained from natives and were...

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