The Library of Greek Mythology

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1998 - Fiction - 291 pages
11 Reviews
The only work of its kind to survive from classical antiquity, the Library of Apollodorus is a unique guide to Greek mythology, from the origins of the universe to the Trojan War. Apollodorus' Library has been used as a source book by classicists from the time of its compilation in the 1st-2nd century BC to the present, influencing writers from antiquity to Robert Graves. It provides a complete history of Greek myth, telling the story of each of the great families of heroic mythology, and the various adventures associated with the main heroes and heroines, from Jason and Perseus to Heracles and Helen of Troy. As a primary source for Greek myth, as a reference work, and as an indication of how the Greeks themselves viewed their mythical traditions, the Library is indispensable to anyone who has an interest in classical mythology. Robin Hard's accessible and fluent translation is supplemented by comprehensive notes, a map and full genealogical tables. The introduction gives a detailed account of the Library's sources and situates it within the fascinating narrative traditions of Greek mythology.
  

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Review: The Library of Greek Mythology (World's Classics)

User Review  - Enda - Goodreads

The reviews to this are by majority idiotic tirades on the piece being 'boring' or-which is just ridiculously obtuse-'not being as informative as expected'. To put this in context; The Library of ... Read full review

Review: The Library of Greek Mythology (World's Classics)

User Review  - David Sarkies - Goodreads

All the Greek myths we know and love - and then some 19 July 2014 This manuscript was a pretty good find, or at least the sections that we did find to complete the manuscript that was handed down to ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

GENEALOGICAL TABLES
9
Genealogical Tables
10
BOOK I
27
SOME INTERPOLATIONS AND AN UNRELIABLE PASSAGE FROM THE EPITOME
171
EXPLANATORY NOTES
177
THE TWELVE GODS
262
REFERENCES TO ANIMALS AND TRANSFORMATIONS
267
INDEX OF NAMES
271
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Robin Hard is Tutor in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Reading.

Bibliographic information