Handbook for the Diplomatic History of Europe, Asia, and Africa, 1870-1914 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1918 - Eastern question - 482 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Black Sea question 187071
39
The peace preliminaries of the FrancoPrussian War
45
German arguments for the annexation of AlsaceLorraine 18701
49
The evacuation of France by the German armies 18711873
50
The formation of the League of the Three Emperors
54
The FrancoGerman War scare of 1875
55
ChinoJapanese relations 18721876
58
The Kuldja affair 18761881
59
The Eastern question 18751877
60
The SerboTurkish War of 1876
70
The AustroRussian accord of 187677
77
AustriaHungary and the Balkan settlement of 1878
81
Page
86
Serbia and the Balkan settlement of 1878
88
Roumania and the Balkan settlement of 1878
93
Montenegro and the Balkan settlement of 1878
94
The English protectorate over Cyprus 18781914
98
The abrogation of the North Schleswig plebiscite agreement
99
18781890
101
The Danube question 18711904
103
The Suez Canal 18811904
105
The formation of the Dual Alliance 1879
108
The formation of the Triple Alliance 1882
111
The renewals of the Triple Alliance
113
Roumania and the Triple Alliance 18831914
115
Bismarcks reinsurance treaty
117
The Bulgarian devolution of 1885
119
The SerboBulgarian War of 188586 124
122
The pacific blockade of Greece 1883
127
The Schnaebele incident 1887
128
FrancoItalian animosity 18861896
129
The partition of Africa 18781885
131
The Dual Control over Egyptian finances 18761883
135
The British occupation of Egypt 18821914
140
The Soudan question 18811899
146
The acquisition of Madagascar by France 18821897
148
AngloGerman rivalry in Southwest Africa 18831886
151
AngloGerman rivalry in East Africa 18851890
153
The question of West Africa 18801898
156
The formation of the Congo Free State 1876 1885
161
The delimitation of European colonies in Central Africa 18851899
167
The international status of the Transvaal or South African Republic 1877 1884
171
British relations to the Boer Republics 18841899
172
The question of the Portuguese colonies
175
The AngloRussian rivalry in Central Asia 18781887
179
The British acquisition of Upper Burma 188586
183
FrancoSiamese relations 18931904
184
European encroachments in the Far East 18751887
186
The journeys of William I1 to the Near East
190
18901904
193
The Brussels antislavery conference of 1890
195
The formation of the Dual Alliance between France and Russia 18871893
197
The ZanzibarHeligoland treaty of 1890
201
The Dreyfus affair
204
Railway concessions in Turkey
205
The GrecoTurkish War 1897
211
The Cretan question 18681897
212
The Armenian question 18781897
216
The Serbian Revolution of 1903
220
FrancoItalian rapprochement 18961902
221
Relations between Italy and Abyssinia 18931900
222
The Fashoda affair 18981899
224
The attempted FrancoGerman accord of 1898
227
The Kruger telegram
229
The seizure of German ships during the Boer War
231
The Treaty of Vereeniging May 31 1902
232
France and Morocco 18941904
234
The annexation of the Congo Free State by Belgium 18891908
237
The Boxer Uprising negotiations and settlement
254
RussoJapanese rivalry in Korea 18951904
265
The Russian advance into Manchuria 18951903
268
The RussoChinese convention for the evacuation of Manchuria April
270
Negotiations preceding the RussoJapanese War 19031904
272
The abrogation of the Japanese extraterritorial city treaties 18721894
275
The AngloFrench arbitration agreement of 1903
280
19041914
282
Secret negotiations between the Kaissr and the Czar in 19041905
288
The seizure of neutral ships by Russia during the RussoJapanese War
293
The Dogger Bank incident 1904
296
The Treaty of Portsmouth
298
The renewals of the AngloJapanese alliance 1905 and 1911
301
The opendoor policy in China 19041914
303
Spheres of influence in China 18971904
306
Railway concessions in China
311
ChinoJapanese relations 19051914
315
Japans relations with Korea 19041910
317
China and the Six Power Loan Syndicate 19081913
319
Question of South Manchuria 19051914
321
The Thibet question 18801914
327
The Mongolian question 18811915
329
The Morocco crisis of 19051906
332
Italy and Morocco
338
Spain and Morocco
339
The Red Sea convention of December 13 1905
343
The Persian question 19061914
345
The formation of the Triple Entente
358
The separation of Norway from Sweden
362
The Baltic and North Sea conventions 1908
365
The Second Hague Conference 1907
367
The Reval interview 1908
371
The annexation of BosniaHerzegovina
374
The Austrian occupation of NoviBazar 18781909
378
The Bulgarian declaration of independence 1908
380
The Bosnian crisis of 19081909
382
The Macedonian question 18781908
385
The Macedonian question 19081912
391
The Cretan question 18971908
394
The Cretan question 19081913
397
The Casablanca affair 19081909
398
The Morocco convention of 1909
401
The Morocco crisis of 1911
402
The Potsdam accord 1910
407
The Bagdad Railway 18991914
409
The Haldane Mission to Berlin 1912
412
The Tripoli question 19021911
417
The Treaty of Lausanne 1912
419
The formation of the Balkan alliance of 1912
421
The efforts of the Powers to prevent the outbreak of the First Balkan War
426
The Treaty of London 1913
429
The Albanian question in the Balkan crisis of 1913
432
The establishment of the Principality of Albania 19121913
435
The effort to prevent the outbreak of the Second Balkan War 1913
437
The Treaty of Bucharest August 10 1913
439
The GrecoSerbian alliance 1913
441
The Treaty of Constantinople 1913
443
Naval and military conversations between England and France 19051912
444
Military conversations between England and Belgium 19061912
446
The attempted AngloGerman naval agreement 19071914
447
The projected AngloGerman accord 1914
449
The London naval conference of 1909
451
The Roman question 18711914
458
FrancoGerman relations 18711914
463
Appendix I
475
Appendix II
482
Index
483

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 256 - It is, of course, too early to forecast the means of attaining this last result ; but the policy of the Government of the United States is to seek a solution which may bring about permanent safety and peace to China, preserve Chinese territorial and administrative entity, protect all rights guaranteed to friendly Powers by treaty and international law, and safeguard for the world the principle of equal and impartial trade with all parts of the Chinese Empire.
Page 41 - Powers, signed a' declaration affirming it to be " an essential principle of the law of nations that no Power can liberate itself from the engagements of a treaty, nor modify the stipulations thereof, unless with the consent of the contracting parties by means of an amicable arrangement.
Page 308 - Great Britain engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of British subjects or of others, any railway Concessions to the north of the Great Wall of China, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway Concessions in that region supported by the Russian Government.
Page 246 - the policy of the Government of the United States is to seek a solution which may bring about permanent safety and peace to China, preserve Chinese territorial and administrative entity, protect all rights guaranteed to friendly Powers by treaty and international law, and safeguard for the world the principle of equal and impartial trade with all parts of the Chinese Empire," He was successful in obtaining the assent of the other Powers to the policy thus announced.
Page 32 - But there is nothing in our laws, or in the law of nations, that forbids our citizens from sending armed vessels, as well as munitions of war, to foreign ports for sale. It is a commercial adventure which no nation is bound to prohibit, and which only exposes the persons engaged in it to the penalty of confiscation.
Page 305 - China. (3) They are accordingly firmly resolved reciprocally to respect the territorial possessions belonging to each other in said region. (4) They are also determined to preserve the common interests of all powers in China by supporting by all pacific means at their disposal the independence and integrity of China and the principle of equal opportunity for commerce and industry of all nations in that empire.
Page 320 - The conditions of the loan seem to us to touch very nearly the administrative independence of China itself, and this administration does not feel that it ought, even by implication, to be a party to those conditions.
Page 456 - The transfer of an enemy vessel to a neutral flag, effected after the outbreak of hostilities, is void unless it is proved that such transfer was not made in order to evade the consequences to which an enemy vessel, as such, is exposed.
Page 322 - The Chinese Government engage, for the purpose of protecting the interest of the South Manchuria Railway, not to construct, prior to the recovery by them of the said railway, any main line in the neighborhood of and parallel to that railway, or any branch line which might be prejudicial to the interest of the above-mentioned railway.
Page 455 - As an exception, a neutral vessel which has been captured by a belligerent warship, and which would be liable to condemnation, may be destroyed if the observance of article 48 would involve danger to the safety of the warship or to the success of the operations in which she is engaged at the time.

Bibliographic information