Kremlin Rising: Vladimir Putin's Russia and the End of Revolution

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Potomac Books, 2007 - History - 465 pages
14 Reviews
With the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia launched itself on a fitful transition to Western-style democracy and a market economy. But a decade later, Boris Yeltsin's handpicked successor--Vladimir Putin, a self-described childhood hooligan turned KGB officer--resolved to end the revolution. Kremlin Rising goes behind the scenes of contemporary Russia to offer a sobering picture of its leader and the direction in which the country is now headed.

As Moscow bureau chiefs for the Washington Post, Peter Baker and Susan Glasser witnessed firsthand the methodical campaign to reverse the post-Soviet revolution and transform Russia back into an authoritarian state. Their gripping narrative moves from Putin's unlikely rise through the key moments of his tenure. But the authors go beyond the politics to draw a moving and vivid portrait of the Russian people they encountered--both those who have prospered and those barely surviving--and show how the political flux has shaped these individuals' lives.

With shrewd reporting and unprecedented access to Putin's insiders, Kremlin Rising offers both unsettling revelations about Russia's leader and a compelling inside look at life in the land he is building. This book is an extraordinary contribution to our understanding of Russia and the debate about the country's uncertain future and its relationship with the United States.

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Review: Kremlin Rising: Vladimir Putin's Russia and the End of Revolution

User Review  - Bill Churchill - Goodreads

All about Putin, the Oligarchs and Russia's modern political dynamic--written with great insight. Read full review

Review: Kremlin Rising: Vladimir Putin's Russia and the End of Revolution

User Review  - DR Pitcock - Goodreads

a hard hitting look at putin's staged world. baker and glasser have done a great job of showing us what pokazukha really means; a false stability created by a master illusionist, Vladimir putin. this book was published in 2005, and after reading it, it's no wonder Russia is where it is today. Read full review

Contents

Tatyanas Russia
1
Fiftytwo Hours in Beslan
15
Project Putin
38
Copyright

22 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Peter Baker is an American political writer and newspaper reporter who is currently White House correspondent for New York Times and a contributing writer for the The New York Times Magazine. He is responsible for covering President Obama and his administration. Prior to joining The New York Times (NYT) in 2008, Baker was a reporter for 20 years at The Washington Post, where he also covered the White House during the presidencies of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Baker co-authored the original story breaking the Lewinsky scandal during Clinton's presidency and served as the paper¿s lead writer during the subsequent impeachment battle. During Bush¿s second term, Baker covered the Iraq War, Hurricane Katrina and the Supreme Court nomination fights. Baker is the author of many NYT bestselling books: The Breach: Inside the Impeachment and Trial of William Jefferson Clinton, Kremlin Rising: Vladimir Putin¿s Russia and the End of Revolution, and Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House. He won the Gerald R. Ford Prize for Distinguished Coverage of the Presidency for his reporting on Bush. Baker is a regular panelist on PBS¿s Washington Week and a frequent guest on other television and radio programs.

Peter Baker and Susan Glasser were Moscow bureau chiefs for "The Washington Post" from January 2001 to November 2004. They are married and live in Washington, D.C., with their son, Theodore.

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