my pedagogic creed (Google eBook)

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Page 6 - Education, therefore, must begin with a psychological insight into the child's capacities, interests, and habits. It must be controlled at every point by reference to these same considerations. These powers, interests, and habits must be continually interpreted -we must know what they mean. They must be translated into terms of their social equivalents— into terms of what they are capable of in the way of social service.
Page 11 - ... thrown into the distant past and becomes dead and inert. Taken as the record of man's social life and progress it becomes full of meaning. I believe, however, that it cannot be so taken excepting as the child is also introduced directly into social life. I believe accordingly that the primary basis of education is in the child's powers at work along the same general constructive lines as those which have brought civilization into being.
Page 4 - ... the only true education comes through the stimulation of the child's powers by the demands of the social situations in which he finds himself. Through these demands he is stimulated to act as a member of a unity, to emerge from his original narrowness of action and feeling, and to conceive of himself from the standpoint of the welfare of the group to which he belongs.
Page 9 - I believe that the social life of the child is the basis of concentration, or correlation, in all his training or growth.} The social life gives the unconscious unity and the background of all his efforts and of all his attainments.
Page 5 - In order to know what a power really is we must know what its end, use, or function is; and this we cannot know save as we conceive of the individual as active in social relationships. But, on the other hand, the only possible adjustment which we can give to the child under existing conditions, is that which arises through putting him in complete possession of all his powers.
Page 17 - I believe it is the business of every one interested in education to insist upon the school as the primary and most effective interest of social progress and reform in order that society may be awakened to realize what the school stands for, and aroused to the necessity of endowing the educator with sufficient equipment properly to perform his task.
Page 16 - All reforms which rest simply upon the enactment of law, or the threatening of certain penalties, or upon changes in mechanical or outward arrangements, are transitory and futile.
Page 38 - Teaching is an art ; there are " ways to do it." This book is made to point out " ways," and to help by suggestions. 1. It gives ' ' ways " for teaching Language, Grammar, Reading, Spelling, Geography, etc. These are in many cases novel ; they are designed to help attract the attention of the pupil. 2. The " ways" given are not the questionable " ways" so often seen practiced in school-rooms, but are in accord with the spirit of modern educational ideas.
Page 43 - In the first place, it is an elaborate treatise on the human mind, of independent merit as representing the latest and best work of all schools of psychological inquiry. But of equal importance, and what will...
Page 37 - Several entirely new features this year of great value. THE TEACHERS' INSTITUTE is published monthly, at $1.00 a year. It is edited in the same spirit and from the same standpoint as THE JOURNAL, and has ever since it was started in 1878 been the most popular educational monthly published, circulating in every state.

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