The Art of Agile Development (Google eBook)

Front Cover
"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", Oct 26, 2007 - Computers - 440 pages
29 Reviews

The Art of Agile Development contains practical guidance for anyone considering or applying agile development for building valuable software. Plenty of books describe what agile development is or why it helps software projects succeed, but very few combine information for developers, managers, testers, and customers into a single package that they can apply directly.

This book provides no-nonsense advice on agile planning, development, delivery, and management taken from the authors' many years of experience with Extreme Programming (XP). You get a gestalt view of the agile development process, including comprehensive guidance for non-technical readers and hands-on technical practices for developers and testers.

The Art of Agile Development gives you clear answers to questions such as:

  • How can we adopt agile development?
  • Do we really need to pair program?
  • What metrics should we report?
  • What if I can't get my customer to participate?
  • How much documentation should we write?
  • When do we design and architect?
  • As a non-developer, how should I work with my agile team?
  • Where is my product roadmap?
  • How does QA fit in?
The book teaches you how to adopt XP practices, describes each practice in detail, then discusses principles that will allow you to modify XP and create your own agile method. In particular, this book tackles the difficult aspects of agile development: the need for cooperation and trust among team members.

Whether you're currently part of an agile team, working with an agile team, or interested in agile development, this book provides the practical tips you need to start practicing agile development. As your experience grows, the book will grow with you, providing exercises and information that will teach you first to understand the rules of agile development, break them, and ultimately abandon rules altogether as you master the art of agile development.

"Jim Shore and Shane Warden expertly explain the practices and benefits of Extreme Programming. They offer advice from their real-world experiences in leading teams. They answer questions about the practices and show contraindications - ways that a practice may be mis-applied. They offer alternatives you can try if there are impediments to applying a practice, such as the lack of an on-site customer.

--Ken Pugh, Author of Jolt Award Winner, Prefactoring

"I will leave a copy of this book with every team I visit."

--Brian Marick, Exampler Consulting
  

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Review: The Art of Agile Development (Theory In Practice)

User Review  - Andy Tischaefer - Goodreads

It's hard to give a reference book 5 stars but I truly think that what Shore did with this book is special. It feels comprehensive without being overwhelming. It is based around practical ideas. It ... Read full review

Review: The Art of Agile Development (Theory In Practice)

User Review  - Olli Sorje - Goodreads

Very good book about agile development and XP. It made me think a lot and I really enjoyed reading it. Read full review

Contents

Part II Practicing XP
71
Part III Mastering Agility
353
References
395

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Popular passages

Page 1 - Working software is the primary measure of progress. • Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. • Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. • Simplicity - the art of maximizing the amount of work not done - is essential. • The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. • At regular intervals, the team reflects on...
Page 1 - Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.
Page 1 - Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. 2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage.
Page xxviii - We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools • Working software over comprehensive documentation • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation • Responding to change over following a plan...
Page xxviii - Working software over comprehensive documentation • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation • Responding to change over following a plan That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. Kent Beck, Mike Beedle, Arie van Bennekum, Alistair Cockburn, Ward Cunningham, Martin Fowler, James Grenning, Jim Highsmith, Andrew Hunt, Ron Jeffries, Jon Kern, Brian Marick, Robert C. Martin, Steve Mellor, Ken Schwaber, Jeff Sutherland, Dave Thomas. © 2001,...

About the author (2007)

James Shore has been leading teams in Agile development since 1999. A team member on that first project introduced him Ward Cunningham's wiki, where they were talking about a crazy idea called Extreme Programming. Despite the ridiculous name, James tried Extreme Programming on his next project and discovered that it worked far better than it sounded. James has been speaking, teaching, and writing about Agile methods ever since. Today, he continues to lead Agile teams using the best ideas from Scrum, Extreme Programming, and Lean. James has contributed a large number of projects and ideas to the Agile community. He authored the first test-driven development framework for .NET web programming and coordinated the development of Ward Cunningham's Fit, the first major acceptance-testing tool. In 2005, the Agile Alliance recognized James with their highest honor, the Gordon Pask Award for Contributions to Agile Practice. James is a featured speaker at conferences around the world. He may be found online at jamesshore.com.

Shane Warden is the Online Managing Editor at O'Reilly Media. He promotes free and open source software for O'Reilly's Open Technology Exchange. In practice, this means editing and researching. He is a co-author of The Art of Agile Development. He has contributed to several projects including Perl 5, Perl 6, Pugs, and, these days, Parrot. Someday, he'd like to claim some responsibility for improving the quality of all software.

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