The creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787

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Published for the Institute of Early American History and Culture at Williamsburg, Va., by the University of North Carolina Press, 1998 - History - 653 pages
19 Reviews
During the Revolutionary era, American political theory underwent a fundamental transformation that carried the nation out of a basically classical and medieval world of political discussion into a milieu that was recognizably modern. This classic work is a study of that transformation. Gordon Wood describes in rich detail the evolution of political thought from the Declaration of Independence to the ratification of the Constitution and in the process greatly illuminates the origins of the present American political system. In a new preface, Wood discusses the debate over republicanism that has developed since - and as a result of - the book's original publication in 1969.

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Review: The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787

User Review  - Mark Singer - Goodreads

Essential for an understanding of how the American Republic was created, from the Declaration of Independence, through the Articles of Confederation and ending with the creation and adoption of the ... Read full review

Review: The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787

User Review  - Jon Glazer - Goodreads

I read this book perhaps 20 years ago and it remains my favorite work of history. I particularly enjoyed the fact that Wood didn't limit his narrative solely to the political ideas that ultimately ... Read full review

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Contents

The Whig Science of Politics
3
THE ENGLISH CONSTITUTION
10
POWER AGAINST LIBERTY
18
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

History professor and award-winning author Gordon S. Wood was born in Concord, Massachusetts on November 27, 1933. After graduating in 1955 from Tufts University he served in the US Air Force in Japan and earned his master's degree from Harvard University. In 1964 Wood earned his Ph.D. in history from Harvard, and he taught there, as well as at the College of William and Mary and the University of Michigan, before joining the Brown University faculty in 1969. Wood has published a number of articles and books, including The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787, which won the Bancroft Prize and the John H. Dunning Prize in 1970, and The Radicalism of the American Revolution, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History and the Ralph Waldo Emerson Prize in 1993. He has won many other awards in the past five decades from organizations such as the American Historical Association, the New York Historical Society, and the Fraunces Tavern Museum. Wood is a fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society.