A Discourse Pronounced at the Request of the Essex Historical Society: On the 18th of September, 1828, in Commemoration of the First Settlement of Salem, in the State of Massachusetts (Google eBook)

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Hilliard, Gray, Little, and Wilkins, 1828 - Salem (Mass.) - 90 pages
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Page 64 - After God had carried us safe to New England, and we had builded our houses, provided necessaries for our livelihood, reared convenient places for God's worship, and settled the civil government, one of the next things we longed for and looked after was to advance learning and perpetuate it to posterity; dreading to leave an illiterate ministry to the churches, when our present ministers shall lie in the dust.
Page 36 - ... we desire you would be pleased to take notice of the principals and body of our company, as those who esteem it our honor to call the Church of England, from whence we rise, our dear mother ; and cannot part from our native country, where she specially resideth, without much sadness of heart and many tears in our eyes, ever acknowledging that such hope and part as we have obtained in the common salvation, we have received it in her bosom, and sucked it from her breasts.
Page 52 - Successors, grant, establish and ordain, that forever, hereafter, there shall be a liberty of conscience allowed in the worship of God, to all persons inhabiting, or which shall inhabit or be resident within our said province, and that all such persons, except papists, shall have a free exercise of religion ; so they be contented with the quiet and peaceable enjoyment of the same, not giving offence or scandal to the government.
Page 39 - We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed ; we are perplexed, but not in despair ; persecuted, but not forsaken ; cast down, but not destroyed...
Page 76 - ... upon the graves of their fathers. They shed no tears, they utter no cries, they heave no groans. There is something in their hearts which passes speech. There is something in their looks, not of vengeance or submission, but of hard necessity, which stifles both, which chokes all utterance, which has no aim or method. It is courage absorbed in despair. They linger but for a moment. Their look is onward. They have passed the fatal stream. It shall never be repassed by them no, never. Yet there...
Page 2 - In Conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled " An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and hooks, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned...
Page 2 - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 77 - Reason as we may, it is impossible not to read in such a fate much, that we know not how to interpret ; much of provocation to cruel deeds and deep resentments ; much of apology for wrong and perfidy ; much of pity, mingling with indignation ; much of doubt and misgiving as to the past ; much of painful recollections ; much of dark forebodings.
Page 76 - There has been a mightier power, a moral canker, which hath eaten into their heart-cores a plague which the touch of the white man communicated a poison, which betrayed them into a lingering ruin. The winds of the Atlantic fan not a single region, which they may now call their own. Already the last feeble remnants of the race are preparing for their journey beyond the Mississippi.
Page 65 - ... to the end that learning may not be buried in the graves of our forefathers in church and commonwealth, the Lord assisting our endeavors.

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