The Phenomenology of Mind

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Courier Corporation, 1931 - Philosophy - 481 pages
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In The Phenomenology of Mind, idealist philosopher Georg Hegel (17701831) defied the traditional epistemological distinction of objective from subjective and developed his own dialectical alternative. Remarkable for the breadth and profundity of its philosophical insights, this work combines psychology, logic, moral philosophy, and history to form a comprehensive view that encompasses all forms of civilization. Its three divisions consist of the subjective mind (dealing with anthropology and psychology), the objective mind (concerning philosophical issues of law and morals), and the absolute mind (covering fine arts, religion, and philosophy).
  

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Masih blank banget sama Hegel nih. Payah ntar dipelajari baek2 dulu kali

Contents

IX
54
X
62
XI
74
XII
97
XIII
104
XIV
112
XV
131
XVI
132
XXI
251
XXII
254
XXIII
282
XXIV
350
XXV
396
XXVI
397
XXVII
412
XXVIII
438

XVII
138
XVIII
198
XIX
223
XX
250
XXIX
463
XXX
477
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Page xliii - tis a thing impossible to frame Conceptions equal to the soul's desires; And the most difficult of tasks to keep Heights which the soul is competent to gain.

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About the author (1931)

G. W. F. Hegel (1770-1831) was one of the leading German philosophers of the nineteenth century. He taught at the University of Heidelberg and the University of Berlin, where he wrote his most important works, "The Phenomenology of the Spirit "(1870) and the "Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences "(1818).
Lisa Marie Anderson is an assistant professor in the Department of German at Hunter College, City University of New York. She resides in New York City.

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