The River Between

Front Cover
Heinemann, 1965 - Fiction - 152 pages
51 Reviews
Explores life on the Makuyu and Kameno ridges of Kenya in the early days of white settlement. Faced with an alluring, new religion and magical customs, the Gikuyu people are torn between those who fear the unknown and those who see beyond it.
  

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I did enjoy it for the most part, but not the ending. - Goodreads
The ending was very blah though. - Goodreads
The writing itself is not of much interest. - Goodreads

Review: The River Between

User Review  - N. Jr. - Goodreads

An excellent description of the typical dilemma African culture has faced since the introduction of Christianity, and the divisions it caused during the time when colonialism became fully entrenched ... Read full review

Review: The River Between

User Review  - Robert Wechsler - Goodreads

I read this novel because I thought Ngugi would win the Nobel Prize today, but he did not. In any event, I'm glad I read it, because it has been very long since I read his work (since reading A Grain ... Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
4
Section 3
10
Section 4
13
Section 5
17
Section 6
23
Section 7
28
Section 8
33
Section 15
71
Section 16
78
Section 17
84
Section 18
91
Section 19
99
Section 20
109
Section 21
114
Section 22
117

Section 9
37
Section 10
45
Section 11
52
Section 12
58
Section 13
61
Section 14
67
Section 23
124
Section 24
130
Section 25
140
Section 26
146
Copyright

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About the author (1965)

Ngugi wa Thiong'o was born in Limuru, Kenya, in 1938,  was educated at the Alliance High School, Kikuyu, at Makerere University, Uganda and at the University of Leeds.
His novel, Weep Not, Child, was published in 1964 and this was followed by The River Between (1965), A Grain of Wheat (1967), and Petals of Blood (1977). Devil on the Cross (1980), was conceived and written during the author's one-year detention in prison, in Kenya, where he was held without trial after the performance by peasants and workers of his play Ngaahika Ndeenda (I Will Marry When I Want).  This was his first work to be published in his own language, Gikutu, and then translated into English and many other languages. His novel Matigari, was published in Gikuyu in Kenya in 1986.

The author has also written collections of short stories, plays and numerous essays. Ngugi is an active campaigner for the African language and form, and he writes, travels and lectures extensively on this theme. His work is known throughout the world and has made powerful impact both at home and overseas.


He now lives and works in the United States, writing and lecturing, and is a Professor at New York University.

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