Confederate Ironclad vs Union Ironclad: Hampton Roads 1862

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Osprey Publishing, Oct 20, 2011 - History - 80 pages
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The Ironclad was a revolutionary weapon of war, the first modern, armoured, self-propelled warships. During the American Civil War the South used ironclads to protect their ports from the Northern blockade. Impressed with their superior resistance to fire and, the North developed its own rival fleet of ironclads. Eventually the two products of this modern arms race duelled at the battle of Hampton Roads in a clash that would change the face of naval warfare. Fully illustrated with cutting-edge digital artwork, rare photographs and first-person perspective gunsight views, this book allows the reader to discover the revolutionary and radically different designs of the two rival Ironclads - the Merrimac and USS Monitor - through an analysis of each ship's weaponry, ammunition and steerage.

  

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Review: Confederate Ironclad vs Union Ironclad: Hampton Roads 1862 (Duel #14)

User Review  - Josh Liller - Goodreads

A solid if incredibly short book. I was surprised to learn of the significance of the nature of the ammunition and gunpowder charges on both ships which were largely responsible for the battle being a draw with no significant damage to either ship. I had never heard of this before. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
4
Chronology
8
Design and Development
10
Technical Specifications
29
The Combatants
34
The Strategic Situation
40
Combat
46
Statistics and Analysis
57
Further Development
61
Aftermath
75
Bibliography and Further Reading
77
Index
80
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Ron Field is Head of History at the Cotswold School in Bourton-on-the-Water. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship in 1982 and taught history at Piedmont High School in California from 1982 to 1983. He was associate editor of the Confederate Historical Society of Great Britain, from 1983 to 1992. He is an internationally acknowledged expert on US Civil War military history, and was elected a Fellow of the Company of Military Historians, based in Washington, DC, in 2005. The author lives in Cheltenham, UK.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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