When Technology Wounds: The Human Consequences of Progress

Front Cover
Morrow, 1990 - Political Science - 285 pages
1 Review
Explains why thousands of dangerous technologies are often employed in our homes, our schools, our workplaces, and in our bodies without adequate assessment of the long-range impact, and often without the consumer's knowledge. Here is a vigorous call to review and assess technological advancement.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

When technology wounds: the human consequences of progress

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

We have a survival-of-the-fittest disregard for those people who are most vulnerable in a technological age, says Glendinning, and we must be catalyzed into caring action. Glendinning, author of ... Read full review

Review: When Technology Wounds: The Human Consequences of Progress

User Review  - Marc Manley - Goodreads

I gave this book three stars, not because it's not interesting or well writte per se, but more because of its format. There's a lot of listing names with their symptoms or issues. This is fine but I ... Read full review

Contents

THE PEOPLE
26
THE WOUNDS
41
THE VICTIM
59
Copyright

12 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1990)

Chellis Glendinning, Ph.D, is a psychologist, writer and lecturer. An award-winning activist and writer, she is the author of four previous books, including Off the Map: An Expedition Deep into Empire and the Global Economy (New Society, 2002) which won the National Federation of Press Women 2000 book award for general nonfiction; My Name is Chellis and I'm in Recovery from Western Civilization (Shambhala, 1994), and When Technology Wounds: The Human Costs of Progress (William Morrow, 1990). He lives in ChimayA3, New Mexico.

Bibliographic information