Anecdotes of Some Distingushed Persons: Chiefly of the Present and Two Preceding Centuries, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1796 - Anecdotes
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Page 247 - I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust.
Page 77 - ... of mine enemies, withdraw your princely favour from me; neither let that stain, that unworthy stain of a disloyal heart towards your good grace, ever cast so foul a blot on your most dutiful wife, and the infant princess your daughter.
Page 247 - I know I have but the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart of a king, and of a king of England too...
Page 76 - ... sovereign lord. And if any person will meddle of my cause, I require them to judge the best. And thus I take my leave of the world, and of you all, and I heartily desire you all to pray for me.
Page 197 - And widows' tears, and orphans' moans ; And all that Misery's hand bestows, To fill the catalogue of human woes.
Page 72 - The hour of my death now approaching, I cannot choose but, out of the love I bear you, advise you of your soul's health, which you ought to prefer before all considerations of the world or flesh whatsoever: for which yet you have cast me into many calamities, and yourself into many troubles. But I forgive you all, and pray God to do so likewise.
Page 59 - ... that he took to heart. He was rather studious than learned; reading most books that were of any worth, in the French tongue, yet he understood the Latin, as appeareth in that cardinal Hadrian and others, who could very well have written French, did use to write to him in Latin.
Page 261 - I, that have borne a bag, be not now in my age forced in effect to bear a wallet ; nor that I, that desire to live to study, may not be driven to study to live, t I most humbly crave pardon of a long letter, after a long silence.
Page 280 - ... worst times, which his age obliged him to do; and how wicked soever the actions were which were every day done, he was confident he had not given his consent to them ; but would have hindered them if he could with his own safety, to which he was always enough indulgent. If he had some infirmities with other men, they were weighed down with wonderful and prodigious abilities and excellencies in the other scale.
Page 377 - As for the gay part of the town, you would find it much more flourishing than you left it. Balls, assemblies, and masquerades have taken place of dull formal visiting days, and the women are become much more agreeable trifles than they were designed.

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