Nature's religion

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, 1997 - Philosophy - 192 pages
0 Reviews
In the wake of both the semiotic and the psychoanalytic revolutions, how is it possible to describe the object of religious worship in realist terms? Semioticians argue that each object is known only insofar as it gives birth to a series of signs and interpretants (new signs). From the psychoanalytic side, religious beliefs are seen to belong to transference energies and projections that contaminate the religious object with all-too-human complexes. In Nature's Religion distinguished theologian and philosopher Robert S. Corrington weaves together the concept of infinite semiosis with that of the transference to show that the self does have access to something in nature that is intrinsically religious. Corrington argues that signs and our various transference fields can and do connect us with fully natural religious powers that are not of our own making, thereby opening up a path past the Western monotheisms to a capacious religion of nature. With a foreword by Robert C. Neville, Nature's Religion is essential reading for philosophers of religion, scholars of the psychology of religion, and theologians.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

SACRED FOLDS
23
INTERVALS
61
UNRULY GROUND
97
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1997)

Robert S. Corrington is a professor of philosophical theology at Drew University in New Jersey. His books include "Nature and Spirit: An Essay in Ecstatic Naturalism" and "An Introduction to C. S. Peirce,"

Bibliographic information