The Wilson Administration and the Great War (Google eBook)

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R. G. Badger, 1922 - United States - 438 pages
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Page 445 - I pledge allegiance to my flag, and to the Republic for which it stands; one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.
Page 246 - States is associated as a belligerent, with the suggestion that if those governments are disposed to effect peace upon the terms and principles indicated, their military advisers and the military advisers of the United States be asked to submit to the governments associated against Germany the necessary terms of such an...
Page 341 - The United States assumes no obligation to preserve the territorial integrity or political independence of any other country...
Page 14 - The effect of the war upon the United States will depend upon what American citizens say and do. Every man who really loves America will act and speak in the true spirit of neutrality, which is the spirit of impartiality and fairness and friendliness to all concerned.
Page 449 - The unity of government which constitutes you one people is also now dear to you. It is justly so, for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence, the support of your tranquillity at home, your peace abroad, of your safety, of your prosperity, of that very liberty which you so highly prize.
Page 239 - States; that it formally accept the status of belligerent which has thus been thrust upon it; and that it take immediate steps not only to put the country in a more thorough state of defense but also to exert all its power and employ all its resources to bring the Government of the German Empire to terms and end the war.
Page 341 - The Members of the League undertake to respect and preserve as against external aggression the territorial integrity and existing political independence of all Members of the League.
Page 258 - The Allied governments have given careful consideration to the correspondence which has passed between the President of the United States and the German Government, Subject to the qualifications, which follow, they declare their willingness to make peace with the Government of Germany on the terms of peace laid down in the President's address to Congress of January, 1918, and the principles of settlement enunciated in his subsequent addresses.
Page 355 - If you have approved of my leadership and wish me to continue to be your unembarrassed spokesman in affairs at home and abroad, I earnestly beg that you will express yourselves unmistakably to that effect by returning a Democratic majority to both the Senate and the House of Representatives.
Page 355 - The leaders of the minority in the present Congress have unquestionably been pro-war, but they have been anti-administration. At almost every turn since we entered the war they have sought to take the choice of policy and the conduct of the war out of my hands and put it under the control of instrumentalities of their own choosing.

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