Caxton's Blanchardyn and Eglantine C. 1489: From Lord Spencer's Unique Imperfect Copy, Completed by the Original French and the Second English Version of 1595, Issue 58 (Google eBook)

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William Caxton, Leon Kellner
Early English Text Society, 1890 - French literature - 242 pages
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Page 248 - ... an amount of good solid work for which all students of our Language, and some of our Literature, must be grateful, and which has rendered possible the beginnings (at least) of proper Histories and Dictionaries of that Language and Literature, and has illustrated the thoughts, the life, the manners and customs of our forefathers and foremothers. But the Society's experience has shown the very small number of those inheritors of the speech of Cynewulf, Chaucer, and Shakspere, who care two guineas...
Page 248 - ... monuments of her early language and life. On the starting of the Society, so many Texts of importance were at once taken in hand...
Page 248 - Society's existence, it has produced, with whatever shortcomings, and at a cost of over 30,000, an amount of good solid work for which all students of our Language, and some of our Literature, must be grateful, and which has rendered possible the beginnings (at least) of proper Histories and Dictionaries of that Language and Literature, and has illustrated the thoughts, the life, the manners and customs of our forefathers and foremothers.
Page xli - A KNIGHT ther was, and that a worthy man, That fro the time that he firste began To riden out, he loved chevalrie, Trouthe and honour, fredom and curtesie.
Page 246 - Member will bring before his or her friends and acquaintances the Society's claims for liberal support. Until all Early English MSS. are printed, no proper History of our Language or Social Life is possible.
Page lxvii - I seye this, be ye redy with good herte To al my lust, and that I frely may, As me best thynketh, do yow laughe or smerte, And nevere ye to grucche it nyght ne day, And eek whan I sey ye, ne sey nat nay, Neither by word, ne frownyng contenance?
Page lxviii - Imperyal and! 4 my wylle, and! I now to retorne wythoute to auenge them He that gaf me suche counceyll, loueth me but lytel, I see wel.
Page 248 - THE Early English Text Society was started by Dr. Furnivall in 1864 for the purpose of bringing the mass of Old English Literature within the reach of the ordinary student, and of wiping away the reproach under which England had long rested, of having felt little interest in the monuments of her early language and life. On the starting of the Society, so many Texts of importance were...
Page 246 - ... arisen for trying to increase the number of the Society's members, and to induce its well-wishers to help it by gifts of money, either in one sum or by instalments. The Committee trust that every Member will bring before his or her friends and acquaintances the Society's claims for liberal support Until all Early English MSS.
Page cxix - ... amours that sore admonested and prayed them to do wel, to thende that som goode tydynges might be reported by them, alimodes seeing his enmyes com alande and in so fayre ordonaunce y sette of that one part, & of that other syde he sawe them of the cyte that cam wyth a grete puyssaunce vpon hym and his folke. It is well ynough to be byleued. that he was not wel assured. But nought therfore as a sharp and hardy knyght as he was the best wyse that he...

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