Pictorial History of the Civil War in the United States of America, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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G.W. Childs, 1866 - United States
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Page 300 - no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors. You have no oath registered in heaven to destroy the Government; whilst I shall have the most solemn one to ' preserve, protect, and defend it.' I am loth to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We
Page 225 - wise and prudent to act upon the suggestions of the first President of the Republic, when, warning his countrymen against attempts to destroy the Union, he said :" One method of assault may be to effect, in the forms of the Constitution, alterations which impair the energy of the system, and 1
Page 299 - present differences, is either party without faith of being in the right? If the Almighty Ruler of Nations, with His eternal truth and justice, be on your side of the North, or on yours of the South, that truth and that justice will surely prevail, by the judgment of this great tribunal of the American people.
Page 296 - Slavery in the States where it exists, believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so Those who nominated and elected me, did so with full knowledge that I
Page 77 - to smite with the fist of wickedness : ye shall not fast as ye do this day, to make your voice to be heard on high. Is it such a fast that I have chosen ? a day for a man to afflict his soul ? Is
Page 78 - cast out to thy house? When thou secst the naked, that thou cover him ; and that thou hide not thyself from thine own flesh ? ... Then shall thou call, and the Lord shall answer ; thou
Page 103 - THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, IN CONVENTION ASSEMBLED, DO DECLARE AND ORDAIN', AND IT IS HEREBY DECLARED AND ORDAINED, THAT THE ORDINANCE ADOPTED BY US IN CONVENTION, ON THE TWENTY-THIRD DAY OF MAY, IN THE YEAR OF
Page 283 - that independence. I have often inquired of myself what great Principle or idea it was that kept the Confederacy so long together. It was not the mere matter of the separation of the Colonies from the mother land,
Page 283 - alone to the people of this country, but, I hope, to the world, for all future time. 2 It was that which gave promise that, in due time, the weight would be lifted from the shoulders of men. This is the sentiment embodied
Page 73 - when Congress shall arm one part of the people against another, for any purpose beyond that of merely protecting the General Government in the exercise of its proper constitutional functions. . . . Congress possesses many means of preserving it by conciliation ; but the sword was not placed in their hands to preserve it by force." Having declared that secession was

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