Rape and Race in the Nineteenth-century South

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Univ of North Carolina Press, 2004 - History - 411 pages
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Sommerville analyzes black-on-white rape cases of the 19th-century South, challenging the notion that race was the sole agent in shaping white ideology on this issue. She shows that race competed with other forces--especially gender and class--to shape the ways southerners related to each other.
  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
iii
NOT SO HEINOUS AS AT FIRST MIGHT BE SUPPOSED Slave Rape Gender and Class in Old South Communities
5
A MANIFEST DISTINCTION BETWEEN A WOMAN AND A FEMALE CHILD Rape Law Children and the Antebellum South
28
HE SHALL SUFFER DEATH BlackonWhite Rape Law in the Early South
58
THE VERY HELPLESSNESS OF THE ACCUSED APPEALS TO OUR SYMPATHY Rape Race and Southern Appellate Law
72
AGAINST ALL ODDS? Free Blacks on Trial for Rape in the Antebellum South
88
RARELY KNOWN TO VIOLATE A WHITE WOMAN Slave Rape in Civil WarEra Virginia
106
OUR JUDICIARY SYSTEM IS A FARCE Remapping the Legal Landscape of Rape in the PostEmancipation South
133
FOUL DAUGHTER OF RECONSTRUCTION? Black Rape in the Reconstruction South
162
THE OLD THREADBARE LIE The Rape Myth and Alternatives to Lynching
186
EPILOGUE
205
RAPE RACE AND RHETORIC The Rape Myth in Historiographical Perspective
209
NOTES
247
BIBLIOGRAPHY
335
INDEX
381
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Diane Miller Sommerville is associate professor of history at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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