Image, Perception, and the Making of U.S.-China Relations (Google eBook)

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Hongshan Li, Zhaohui Hong
University Press of America, Jan 1, 1998 - Political Science - 411 pages
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Image, Perception, and the Making of U.S.-China Relations examines major events in the history of the relationship between the U.S. and China to show the development and effects of national images and perceptions. These essays expose the effects of ideology as represented through foreign policy and the actions of leaders, as well as the role of the media and governments in shaping public opinion and attitudes. They show the evolution of the influential forces from the nineteenth century through the twentieth century. In each country, a small group of people has always controlled these forces by manipulating the power of the media and governments. The nature of this situation changed national perceptions as power often moved from one small group to another. As a result of manipulating the images and perceptions of each country, these biased and untrue views have inevitably led to conflict between the two countries.
  

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Contents

Image and Perception in USChina Relations
1
In the Eyes of the Eagle
15
Myth or Reality American Perceptions of the China Market
17
News Making and News Reporting in the United States
43
USChina Relations in Print
73
An Analysis on Some Theoretical Aspects
101
Social Changes in China
121
Perceiving the United States
143
A Story of Misperceptions 19601970
189
AntiAmerican Nationalism in China Causes and Formation
233
From Perception to Policy
255
American Visions of Democracy and the Marshall Mission to China
257
Creating a Favorable Image The Role of Foreign Student Advising
313
The Role of Individuals in USChina Relations 19491972
345
New War of Nerves Maos Legacy in Beijings Policy toward Taiwan
365
ChinaUS Relations and the Vietnam War
389

Chinese Students in the United States 19061938
145
Maos Ideology Personality and the CCPs Foreign Relations
169
Note on the Contributors
409
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About the author (1998)

Hongshan Li is president of Chinese Historians in the United States, and is Assistant Professor of History at Kent State University.

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