The Cornhill Magazine  (Google eBook)

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Page 173 - Wilt thou have this Woman to thy wedded wife, to live together after God's ordinance in the holy estate of Matrimony? Wilt thou love her, comfort her, honour, and keep her in sickness and in health; and, forsaking all other, keep thee only unto her, so long as ye both shall live?
Page 113 - A sect, whose chief devotion lies In odd perverse antipathies ; In falling out with that or this, And finding somewhat still amiss ; More peevish, cross, and splenetic, Than dog distract or monkey sick...
Page 35 - All round the house is the jet-black night; It stares through the window-pane; It crawls in the corners, hiding from the light, And it moves with the moving flame. Now my little heart goes a-beating like a drum, With the breath of the Bogie in my hair; And all round the candle the crooked shadows come And go marching along up the stair. The shadow of the balusters, the shadow of the lamp, The shadow of the child that goes to bed All the wicked shadows coming, tramp, tramp, tramp, With the black...
Page 156 - Memory," now appearing in the Cornhill Magazine, will be interesting to members of the medical profession : " Upon the whole, and for a ' scratch ' companion, I prefer a doctor to a man of any other calling. He may not be very good as a conversationalist, but he is rarely very bad, like a cheroot. He has had a genuine experience of life, and has seen down to the depths of it ; a sick man does not attempt to deceive his doctor, or put the best face on his character, as he does with a priest. Moreover,...
Page 261 - Verse, a breeze mid blossoms straying, Where Hope clung feeding, like a bee Both were mine ! Life went a-maying With Nature, Hope, and Poesy, When I was young ! When I was young ? Ah, woful When ! Ah ! for the change...
Page 365 - She dresses simply in close-fitting garments, technically known as tailor-made. She wears her elbows well away from her side. It has been hinted that this habit serves to diminish the apparent size of the waist. This may be so. Men do not always understand such things. It certainly adds to a somewhat aggressive air of independence which finds its birth in the length of her stride. Novissima strides in (from the hip) where men and angels fear to tread. In the evening simplicity again marks her dress....
Page 189 - England, presumed to have been either lost or destroyed, amounting to $6,650,000 odd, every cent of which was clear profit to the bank. In many instances, however, it is possible to recover the amount of the note from the bank in full. Notice has to be given to the bank of the note supposed to have been lost or stolen, together with a small fee and full narrative as to how the loss occurred. The note is then ' stopped ' that is, if the document should be presented for payment the person ' stopping...
Page 365 - Pictures no, I do not care about pictures,' she says. ' They are all so pretty nowadays.' She has a way of talking of noted men by their surnames tout court, indicative of a familiarity with them not enjoyed by her hearer. She has a certain number of celebrities whom she marks out for special distinction obscurity being usually one of their merits. Prettiness is one of her pet aversions. Novissima is, by the way, not pretty herself. She is white. Pink girls call her sallow. She has a long...
Page 367 - Which is the worst of science. It looks upon us all as specimens, and expects us to prove something. Novissima is pleased to approve of my lady's judgment in sending her down to dinner with Calamus. She feels that the other girls are a long way below his mental level that they are wholly unfitted to manufacture conversation of a quality calculated to suit his literary taste. Calamus happens to be rather a simple-minded young man. He has been everywhere. He has seen most things, and nothing seems...
Page 28 - Later, as the sun grew more powerful, the ' sengas,' exquisite little parrakeets with feathers of the gayest green, blue, crimson, purple, and yellow came chattering by in pairs, and might be seen clinging to the fruit-blossoms, from which they sucked the nectar; and overhead the tropic birds, sailing in wide circles, their snowy plumage and long red tail-feathers (the latter a distinguishing feature in the head-dress of certain Samoan chiefs) showing distinctly against the blue sky. Mr....

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