Our Renaissance: Essays on the Reform and Revival of Classical Studies (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green & Company, 1917 - Classical education - 281 pages
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Page 57 - I am delighted with the law of God, according to the inward man : But I see another law in my members, fighting against the law of my mind, and captivating me in the law of sin, that is in my members.
Page 122 - The question is not whether the methods of the old school, long lessons by heart of grammar, of prosody, or of extracts; the Greek grammar written in the Latin tongue, long compositions and impositions backed up by the ferula and the birch-rod whether I say, these things produced a result which was good in its way and for its day, but will they do now? Now we have reforms in teaching French and other spoken tongues, in teaching natural science, in teaching geometry, in teaching modern history....
Page 121 - We must no longer assume that what did very well in our fathers' and grandfathers' time should do very well for us. Even in our own younger days these things were only beginning to be in question, and we went on pretty much in the old groove, with perhaps, a little criticism, which nobody attended to in practice. The question is not whether the methods of the old school, long lessons by heart of grammar, of prosody, or of extracts; the Greek grammar written in the Latin tongue, long compositions...
Page 223 - ... museums than is now appreciated. (3) The initiative in this work is usually taken by the museums, and school authorities who have not had actual experience with it are not thoroughly alive to its advantages. (4) Museum facilities are available to schools in various localities to a very unequal degree. There is clearly need of some agency to stimulate and coordinate museum educational work throughout the country and to diffuse a full knowledge of it among schools and other educational organizations.
Page 19 - ... to attain to, any religion in the deepest sense of the word, is very largely due to my Greek studies. I don't say exclusively. I don't speak of supernatural grace. I don't refer to the most cogent arguments of a metaphysical sort. It is merely a psychological fact that I would describe. In those dark hours which, I take it, all souls, Christian and pagan, have to experience, those hours of wrestling with doubt, with misgiving, with spiritual despondency, I have found no human document which has...
Page 33 - We reformers consider that it is a crime as well as a blunder on the part of Classical teachers to neglect the opportunities provided by modern archaeological research for illuminating our subject and bringing it home to the minds and senses of our students. It is all very well to sneer at the kinematograph as something unspeakably degrading to modern society.
Page 33 - ... consider that it is a crime as well as a blunder on the part of Classical teachers to neglect the opportunities provided by modern archaeological research for illuminating our subject and bringing it home to the minds and senses of our students. It is all very well to sneer at the kinematograph as something unspeakably degrading to modern society. But I know very well that if I wanted to learn how some action was really carried on I should rather see a kinematograph record than read an account...
Page 121 - I am perfectly clear that under modern conditions, unless we mend our ways, the game is by no means worth the candle. I do not mean that we must merely improve our methods in a superficial way, but that we must have a fundamental reform in our whole attitude. We must no longer assume that what did very well in our fathers' and grandfathers' time should do very well for us.
Page 258 - ... history from an uninteresting drudgery into a time thoroughly enjoyed and remembered through life. The advantages which spring from free and constant use of maps, relief-maps and the like, need scarcely in these days be insisted on, since they may now be regarded as generally recognized. In my opinion the attempt directly to illustrate Greek and Roman literature by works of art and antiquities, even when made by trained archaeologists, can never come to very much. It may sometimes be useful,...
Page 3 - ... loyal service would be lowered through daring to despise the record of the past. In the remarks which I shall offer in illustration of this thesis I shall take it for granted that you, as members of an almost national Classical Association, believe with me that no mental discipline can be better than that which aims at producing an understanding of and a reasonable sympathy with Classical life, and more particularly with Hellenism.

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JSTOR: Our Renaissance: Essays on the Reform and Revival of ...
Our Renaissance: Essays on the Reform and Revival of Classical Studies. By HENRY BROWNE, sj London: Longmans, I9I7. 8vo, pp. xvi+28i. $2.60 net. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0009-8353(191810)14%3A1%3C77%3AOREOTR%3E2.0.CO%3B2-N

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