The Overspent American: Why We Want What We Don't Need

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Harper Collins, Apr 7, 1999 - Social Science - 272 pages
42 Reviews
The Overspent American explores why so many of us feel materially dissatisfied, why we work staggeringly long hours and yet walk around with ever-present mental "wish lists" of things to buy or get, and why Americans save less than virtually anyone in the world. Unlike many experts, Harvard economist Juliet B. Schor does not blame consumers' lack of self-discipline. Nor does she blame advertisers. Instead she analyzes the crisis of the American consumer in a culture where spending has become the ultimate social art.
  

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Review: The Overspent American: Why We Want What We Don't Need

User Review  - Katie - Goodreads

An interesting discussion, but no surprises here. Read full review

Review: The Overspent American: Why We Want What We Don't Need

User Review  - Izarra Varela - Goodreads

Since I read this back in high school, this has been my go-to title for people who don't understand why they can't make ends meet. (*Pssst! Try moving those ends closer together!*) Read full review

Contents

Introduction i
1
When Spending Becomes You
65
The Downshifter Next Door
119
Will Consuming Less Wreck the Economy?
169
Bibliography
175
Appendixes
187
O rga niza tiom
209
Index 24
215
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Juliet B. Schor, bestselling author of The Overworked American and senior lecturer and Director of Studies, Women's Studies, at Harvard University, writes and lectures widely on issues of work and consumption. She lives in Newton, Massachusetts, with her husband and two children.

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