People's Power: Cuba's Experience with Representative Government

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Westview Press, 1999 - History - 284 pages
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People’s Power is a theoretical and historical account of representative government in Cuba. It explains how the Cuban model was built on the theoretical foundations set in Rousseau, Marx, and Lenin, and the historical precedents of the Paris Commune, the 1905 and 1917 soviets, and the pre- and post-Stalin years of the Soviet Union. It encompasses the institution of the Organs of People’s Power in 1974, through the changes brought by the 1992 Constitution and election law, to the present. The book’s primary focus is on the municipal level, but it also contains important material on the national and provincial elected bodies. People’s Power also explores firsthand the more recent people’s councils and workers’ parliaments.

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Contents

Early Theories of Socialist Representative Government
9
Marx and Engels
16
Conclusion
26
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Peter Roman is professor of political science at The Graduate Center, The City University of New York.

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