Contested Truths: Keywords in American Politics Since Independence

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Harvard University Press, 1998 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 270 pages
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Contention, argument, and power have always been the tradition in American political talk. Any country that began in a revolution was bound to have this history. But the language of argument uses particular words with particular, sometimes shifting, meanings and to know what they are and what they meant over time is a critical contribution to political history. It is true that politicians may act as though they are part of no particular ideological tradition, but history shows that, more often than not, they use an understood meaning to enhance their actions. As Daniel Rodgers shows in this book, rhetoric has consequences.

  

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Contents

Utility
17
Natural Rights
45
The People
80
Government
112
The State
144
Interests
176
Epilogue
212
PUBLIC TALK
222
GUIDE TO FURTHER READING
253
INDEX
259
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Daniel T. Rodgers is Henry Charles Lea Professor of History at Princeton University.

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