Public Passions: The Trial of Shi Jianqiao and the Rise of Popular Sympathy in Republican China (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, 2007 - History - 304 pages
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In 1935, a Chinese woman by the name of Shi Jianqiao murdered the notorious warlord Sun Chuanfang as he prayed in a Buddhist temple. This riveting work of history examines this well-publicized crime and the highly sensationalized trial of the killer. In a fascinating investigation of the media, political, and judicial records surrounding this "cause celebre, "Eugenia Lean shows how Shi Jianqiao planned not only to avenge the death of her father, but also to attract media attention and galvanize public support. Lean traces the rise of a new sentiment "public sympathy" in early twentieth-century China, a sentiment that ultimately served to exonerate the assassin. The book sheds new light on the political significance of emotions, the powerful influence of sensational media, modern law in China, and the gendered nature of modernity."
  

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Review: Public Passions: The Trial of Shi Jianqiao and the Rise of Popular Sympathy in Republican China

User Review  - Xiaomin Zu - Goodreads

Top-notch. I cannot believe this is a first book ... need to check out the author. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
A Tale of Moral Heroism and Female SelfFashioning in an Age of Mass Communication
21
Public Justice and the Sympathy of an Urban Audience
49
Fear of the Masses and Feminized Sentiment
77
Courtroom Spectacle and Ethical Sentiment in the Rule of Law
106
Sanctioned Violence under Nationalist Rule
141
From Wartime Patriotism to CounterRevolutionary Sentiment
180
Conclusion
207
Notes
215
Glossary of Selected Chinese Names and Terms
249
References
257
Index
275
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Page xi - I would also like to thank my colleagues at the University of Alaska Anchorage for their interest in and encouragement of this project.
Page xii - Fellowship and completed with a grant from the Committee for Scholarly Communication with the People's Republic of China.

About the author (2007)

Eugenia Lean is Assistant Professor of History at Columbia University.

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