A History of Scottish Architecture: From the Renaissance to the Present Day

Front Cover
Edinburgh University Press, 1996 - Architecture - 626 pages
0 Reviews

How do states distinguish friends from enemies, partners from competitors, and communities from outsiders? Community Under Anarchy shows how the development of common social identities among political elites can lead to deeper, more cohesive forms of cooperation than what has been previously envisioned by traditional theories of international relations. Drawing from recent advances in social theory and constructivist approaches, Bruce Cronin demonstrates how these cohesive structures evolve from a series of discrete events and processes that help to diminish the conceptual boundaries dividing societies.

Community Under Anarchy supports this thesis through a new and original interpretation of the Concert of Europe, the Holy Alliance, and the political integration of Italy and Germany. In the wake of the upheavals created by the French Revolution and the revolutions of 1848, political elites helped to validate new forms of governance by creating transnational reference groups from which they could draw legitimacy. As a result, European states were able to overcome the polarizing effects of anarchy and create a concert system, a common security association, and two amalgamated security communities. The empirical cases demonstrate how socially derived identities can shape state preferences and create new roles for state leaders.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

to the Present
38
The Crisis of Modernity
449
The Architecture of Social Complexity
455
An Architecture
465
Modernity Rejected
475
Postmodernism
481
1980s Urbanism
488
Return to Idealism?
494
Conclusion
501
Eclectic Classicism and the Modern City
508
Mass Modernity and Architectural
514
Bibliography and Notes
521
Glossary
543
Index
604
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1996)

Miles Glendinning is head of the Topographical and Threatened Buildings Surveys at the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. Aonghus MacKechnie is Principal Inspector of Historic Buildings at Historic Scotland. Both contributed to A History of Scottish Architecture from the Renaissance to the Present Day, and Glendinning is also the author, with David Page, of Clone City: Crisis and Renewal in Contemporary Scottish Architecture.

Bibliographic information