History of Augusta County, Virginia (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Samuel M. Yost & son, 1882 - Augusta County (Va.) - 387 pages
2 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Having read the introduction and first chapter, I find the book very readable and full of information. I can't say anything about the usefulness of information, but the author seems to take care in pointing out where 'traditional stories' are the basis of his writing.
Chapter 2 lays shows how representative government sprouted naturally in Virginia soon after the colony attained a sustainable size, in the 1620's.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

The account on page 199 attributed to Kercheval, of Captain Samuel Teter, was written by Teter's nephew Joseph Doddridge in 1824, "Notes on the Settlement and Indian Wars" which is also available here in digitized form (2nd and 3rd editions). Kercheval inadequately credited Doddridge in his 1833 work "A History of the Valley of Virginia" which is also available here, digitized from later editions. 

Contents


Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 96 - I, AB, do swear, That I do from my heart abhor, detest, and abjure, as impious and heretical, that damnable doctrine and position, That princes excommunicated or deprived by the pope, or any authority of the see of Rome, may be deposed or murdered by their subjects, or any other whatsoever.
Page 160 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it; I have killed many; I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country, I rejoice at the beams of peace; but do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 44 - The wisdom of a learned man cometh by opportunity of leisure: and he that hath little business shall become wise. How can he get wisdom that holdeth the plough, and that glorieth in the goad, that driveth oxen, and is occupied in their labours, and whose talk is of bullocks?
Page 356 - I despair of giving you any idea of the effect produced by this short sentence, unless you could perfectly conceive the whole manner of the man as well as the peculiar crisis in the discourse. Never before did I completely understand what Demosthenes meant by laying such stress on delivery.
Page 228 - ... accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.
Page 356 - His enunciation was so deliberate, that his voice trembled on every syllable; and every heart in the assembly trembled in unison. His peculiar phrases had that force of description that the original scene appeared to be, at that moment, acting before our eyes. We saw the very faces of the Jews: the staring, frightful distortions of malice and rage. We saw the buffet; my soul kindled with a flame of indignation; and my hands were involuntarily and convulsively clinched.
Page 109 - The supplicating tears of the women and moving petitions of the men melt me into such deadly sorrow, that I solemnly declare, if I know my own mind, I could offer myself a willing sacrifice to the butchering enemy, provided that would contribute to the people's ease.
Page 96 - James, and since his decease, pretending to be and taking upon himself the stile and title of King of England by the name of James the Third, or of Scotland by the name of James the Eighth, or the stile and title of King of Great Britain, hath not any right or title whatsoever to the crown of this realm...
Page 96 - And all these things I do plainly and sincerely acknowledge and swear, according to these express words by me spoken, and according to the plain and common sense and understanding of the same words, without any equivocation, mental evasion or secret reservation whatsoever. And I do make this recognition, acknowledgment, abjuration, renunciation and promise heartily, willingly and truly, upon the true faith of a Christian. So help me God.
Page 355 - I had heard the subject handled a thousand times. I had thought it exhausted long ago. Little did I suppose that in the wild woods of America I was to meet with a man whose eloquence would give to this topic a new and more sublime pathos than I had ever before witnessed.

Bibliographic information