The Wisconsin Frontier

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Indiana University Press, 1998 - Biography & Autobiography - 336 pages
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From French coureurs de bois coursing through its waterways in the 17th century, To the lumberjacks who rode logs down those same rivers in the late 19th century, Wisconsin’s frontier era saw thousands arriving from Europe and other areas seeking wealth and opportunity. Indians mixed with these newcomers, sometimes helping and sometimes challenging them, often benefiting from their guns, pots, blankets, and other trade items.
France, Britain, And The United States fought to control the Upper Lakes, For besides its natural riches, Wisconsin lay astride the major water route linking the St. Lawrence And The Gulf of Mexico. The British were long reluctant to give up this region they lost through war and diplomacy, but eventually the victorious Americans arriving in the early 19th Century transformed the region seeking lead, cropland, wild game, and timber.
As population grew the Indians realized that incoming groups wanted land as well as furs, and a series of struggles erupted that eventually left Chippewas, Menominees, And The “New York Indians” with reservations while the Winnebagoes and Potawatomis obtained smaller holdings; but many of them, As well as members of such tribes as the Foxes and Sacs, moved beyond the Mississippi under government treaties.
The settlers’ frontier produced a state with enormous ethnic variety, but one whose rambunctiousness worried distant governmental and religious authorities, who soon dispatched officials and missionaries to guide the new settlements.
By 1900 an era was rapidly passing, leaving Wisconsin’s peoples with traditions of optimism and self-government—but confronting them also with tangled cutover lands and game scarcities that were a legacy of the settlers’ belief in the inexhaustible resources of the frontier.
A History of the Trans-Appalachian Frontier—Walter Nugent and Malcolm Rohrbough, general editors
  

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Review: Wisconsin Frontier

User Review  - Jim - Goodreads

It was interesting to think of Wisconsin as the Western frontier. The state's northern forests only saw sustained white exploitation in the second half of the 19th century. As defined in this book ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
NlCOLET LANDING AT GREEN Bav IO34
13
Efficv mouNns at tue MeNnota Asvlum grouN0s ManisoN
33
INniaN village oN the Wolf River
43
FreNcttmeN aNn INniaNs
49
Juliet KiNzie
129
111
135
Black HawS
186
Cttief Osukosu of tue MeNomiNees
222
ONeina INniaNs iN school circa ig
232
WlNNEBAGos PICKING CRANBERRIEs
242
Louis BlaNcharn
253
246
263
Logs floatiNg nowN tue Black River
279
II
283
Essay on Sonrces 29
327

Log cariN i
211

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About the author (1998)

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Mark Wyman is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at Illinois State University. He is author of several books, including Round-Trip to America: The Immigrants Return to Europe, 1880--1930 and Hoboes: Bindlestiffs, Fruit Tramps, and the Harvesting of the West.

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