A dictionary of old English plays, existing either in print or in manuscript, from the earliest times to the close of the seventeenth century: including also notices of Latin plays written by English authors during the same period (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J.R. Smith, 1860 - English drama - 296 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 270 - The Whole Contention betweene the two Famous Houses, Lancaster and Yorke. With the Tragicall ends of the good Duke Humfrey, Richard Duke of Yorke, and King Henrie the sixt. Diuided into two Parts : And newly corrected and enlarged. Written by William Shakespeare, Gent. Printed at London, for TP" A small quarto, containing 64 leaves, A to Q in fours.
Page 142 - His True Chronicle History of the Life and death of King Lear, and his three Daughters. With the vnfortunate life of Edgar, sonne and heire to the Earle of Glocester, and his sullen and assumed humour of Tom of Bedlam.
Page 59 - The First part of the Contention betwixt the two famous Houses of Yorke and Lancaster, with the death of the good Duke Humphrey : And the banishment and death of the Duke of Suffolke, and the Tragicall end of the proud Cardinall of Winchester, with the notable Rebellion of lacke Cade: And the Duke of Yorkes first claime vnto the Crowne.
Page 11 - This was the fatal period of that virtuous fabric, wherein yet nothing did perish but wood and straw, and a few forsaken cloaks ; only one man had his breeches set on fire, that would perhaps have broiled him, if he had not by the benefit of a provident wit put it out with bottle ale.
Page 223 - If this First Part, Gentles, do like you well, The Second Part shall greater murthers tell.
Page 11 - King Henry, making a masque at the Cardinal Wolsey's house, and certain cannons being shot off at his entry, some of the paper or other stuff wherewith one of them was stopped, did light on the thatch...
Page 179 - The New Inn : or the Light Heart, a Comedy. As it was never acted, but most negligently played by some, the King's servants ; and more squeamishly beheld and censured by others, the King's subjects.
Page 74 - Eneas' narration of the destruction of Troie) was livelie described in a marchpaine patterne ; there was also a goodlie sight of hunters with full crie of a kennel of hounds, Mercurie and Iris descending and ascending from and to an high place, the tempest wherein it hailed small confects, rained rose-water, and snew an artificial kind of snow, all strange, marvellous, and abundant.
Page 79 - to claim the promise just upon the finishing of a poem, when I would have been glad of a little respite. Two- thirds of it belonged to him; and to me only the first scene of the play, the whole fourth act, and the first half, or somewhat more, of the fifth.
Page 63 - In the city of Gloucester the manner is (as I think it is in other like corporations) that, when players of enterludes come to...

Bibliographic information